Podcast: interview with Xosé Castro on his presentation at ProZ.com upcoming conference in Montevideo, Uruguay Reply

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

On October 29 and 30 ProZ.com First Latin American Conference 2011 will be held in Montevideo, Uruguay. The goal of this conference is to provide translators with a means to stay updated on the main areas of the translation business. One of the speakers at the conference will be Xosé Castro Roig, who is a freelance translator, editor, proofreader, copywriter, TV host, semi-pro photographer and stand-up comedian. Xosé travels around the world teaching writing, translation and proofreading in Spanish. The session he will be presenting in Uruguay is entitled “Dudas ortográficas frecuentes y novedades de la reforma académica“. In this session Xosé will be speaking about common doubts about Spanish spelling and grammar translators, proofreaders and editors may have. He will also be addressing the latest reform by the Royal Academy of Spanish (RAE, in Spanish).

Xosé believes that apart from networking, acquiring knowledge and sharing experiences one of the main benefits of attending conferences about translation and interpretation is human contact. In his opinion nothing compares to meeting a colleague in person. This is the basis for building a solid foundation for a professional relationship. In his words conferences are the opportunity of putting a face to a name.

I also asked Xosé to provide a brief description on how he got involved with translation and how he chooses the varied topics of his presentations. I could not help asking him about the role humor played in his professional life and he explained that humor is a fundamental part of his life. He cannot conceive the idea of being bored with what you do and he strongly believes everything is better with a smile.

Towards the end of the interview Xosé gives a very interesting piece of advice to aspiring translators and translators trying to get established.

I feel very lucky to have had the chance to attend one of Xosé’s presentations and I highly recommend them, not only because the content is enriching and helpful but also because you will have a lot of fun. Xosé uses humor as one of his main strategies to reach his audience and his strategy never fails.

You cannot miss the opportunity to meet Xosé Castro Roig in person in Montevideo. There is still time to register for the conference in Uruguay so hurry! You will have a great time. You can see the full program here.

You can listen to the interview with Xosé here: ProZ.com podcast, 2011-10-21

If you have any suggestions for possible themes for upcoming podcasts you can send them to romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom.

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Thanks for listening!

Podcast: Interview with Lucia Leszinsky on the upcoming ProZ.com site guidance day
 and the Certified PRO Network virtual conference 2

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

As you may know already, the International Translation Day celebration at ProZ.com (Sep 26 – Sep 30) is around the corner. This year there will be a big celebration under the theme “Small changes, big results!” There will be five days dedicated to this virtual event — the Certified PRO Network virtual conference (Sep 26)
, the ProZ.com site guidance day
 (Sep 27), the Recruitment day (Sep 28), The Great Translation Debate (Sep 29) and the traditional Freelance translator virtual conference (Sep 30). This week, I interviewed Lucia Leszinsky, ProZ.com site staff member devoted to site guidance activities and ProZ.com Certified PRO Network coordinator, who is in charge of the organization of the Site Guidance Day and the Certified PRO Network Virtual Conference to learn more about these events.

I was specially curious about the site guidance event and Lucía explained that the ProZ.com site guidance event will be a day of presentations on how to get the most out of ProZ.com. It will include sessions and discussions on ProZ.com’s most popular features, tools and benefits, and attendees will be able to learn how to customize their profiles to meet clients in and outside the site, know more about getting started in translation or expanding their businesses by using the site effectively. During the event attendees will be able to also discuss about the most effective way to use the Blue Board to assess risk and how to use the KudoZ term help system to receive and give help with the translation of tough terms. This event will be about learning how to use ProZ.com for the attendees’ benefit and what is very important is that all ProZ.com’s registered users, members and non-members, are invited to participate.

The theme for this year’s conference is “Small changes, big results” so I asked Lucía what big results could attendees to the event expect by simply participating in this event. She explained that attendees will see how applying small changes to their ProZ.com profiles, or attending a short training session, or even checking potential clients’ contact details before taking on a project makes a huge difference when it comes to client contact and improving their businesses.

I also asked Lucía about the Certified PRO Network Virtual Conference planned for September 26, 2011 and she mentioned that this event will also be a day of presentations on professional promotion, translation tools, translator training and more. This is an event planned for professional translators so access will be restricted to members of the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network only.

Members of the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network who wish to attend this event can register also by clicking on “Register now” in the event page. Those site members that are not yet members of the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network are still on time to apply for inclusion into the network and take part in this event.

At the end of the interview I asked Lucía to mention three benefits that attendees can get from participating in these events and she did not hesitate to assert that ProZ.com virtual events in general offer attendees unparalleled access to educational content, networking and recruitment opportunities, and more, all within a rich and engaging online environment. She thinks they are a perfect opportunity to network with colleagues, meet clients, expand the knowledge of the translation industry, CAT tools, and other translation and interpretation-related topics. Attendees to virtual events can also meet the site staff virtually and receive personalized assistance with using the tools the site offers to network, improve their work, expand their businesses and have fun.

Listen to the interview with Lucía here: ProZ.com podcast, 2011-09-15

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

Don’t forget to sign up for the events planned for the free ProZ.com’s virtual event series 2011. All these events are designed to celebrate International Translation Day so you cannot miss them!

Thanks for listening and see you at ProZ.com’s virtual event series 2011

Romina

Podcast: interview with Rahzeb Choudhury about the upcoming “Great Translation Debate” 3

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

On September 29, 2011 TAUS and ProZ.com will host the Great Translation Debate online so I interviewed Rahzeb Choudhury, Operations Director at TAUS, to learn more about the ideas behind this debate and about the topics that will be discussed.

Before going into the details about the upcoming event I asked Rahzeb to explain briefly what TAUS does and describe its mission. He explained that TAUS aims to help people to use technology more effectively by informing properly about translation automation. They aim to help people improve their strategies for translation. TAUS’ mission is to increase the size and significance of the translation industry to help the world communicate better. He also explained that the idea for this event came up quite a long time ago, in December last year, as they were reviewing a series called translation in the 21st century where they covered what major companies were doing, the challenges and opportunities available for translation companies and a couple of articles on the changing role of translators. They wanted to continue on those topics because they are relevant so they thought the idea of the debate would open up the discussion. During the debate participants will be able to discuss a motion and vote for or against it and it is expected that this format will help create a lively debate.

I also asked Rahzeb about his opinion regarding translators and their changing roles. He said that in his opinion translators are vital for a successful and dynamic machine translation experience; translators are the source of quality translations, which often results in translation memories, and translation memories are a great fuel for creating the best in-class machine translation systems. He also indicated that translators play a complex role — as translators, post-editors, editors, terminologists, quality assurance advisers, etc. All this impacts on the role to play in machine translation workflows. Rahzeb believes translators will continue to be better than machine translation in many scenarios but they inevitably will want and need to shift their skills. This is normal in a lot of industries in which there is change or some sort of  revolution happening and it is important that translators are informed about translation automation in general. This debate will help in that process.

I was very intrigued by the concept of “interoperability” and Rahzeb explained it using very simple examples. He said that interoperability happens when you travel abroad and you can still use your bank card to cash your money in any cash machine or when you can use your mobile phone in other countries. This happens because the technology infrastructure supports standards protocols, standard information exchange formats and systems comply with these formats so then information can pass from one system to another seamlessly without losing value. In his view interoperability is important for the translation profession because it will make the industry more efficient and more capable. It will provide people with more choice of tools and access to cheaper tools.

During the debate the following topics will be discussed and presented as motions:

  • Translation automation is good for the translation profession
  • Interoperability is important for the translation profession
  • It makes sense for translators to share translation memories
  • Higher education courses prepare translators sufficiently for life in industry

These affect everyone in different ways so it is important that all players in the translation industry participate. The open format for the discussion that this virtual debate provides presents a rare opportunity to express everyone’s view. There will be constructive outcomes and everyone will learn from one another.

Listen to the interview with Rahzeb here: ProZ.com podcast, 2011-08-26

You can also check this article on individual translators and data exchange standards recently published by TAUS.

Those interested in participating in the Great Translation Debate on September 29, 2011 can register here. This event will be one in a series planned for the 2011 ProZ.com virtual conference week (September 26 – 30, 2011).

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Romina

P.S. Sorry folks for the background noise!

Podcast: interview with Konstantin Kisin about productivity, negotiation and communication skills 1

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

This week I interviewed Certified PRO member and ProZ.com trainer Konstantin Kisin, who speaks at conferences all over the world on topics like managing relationships with clients, improving productivity and communication & negotiation skills to learn more about these topics.

In this interview Konstantin explains that a good negotiator is someone able to communicate with other people in a way that works for them and knows what motivates them. He describes the concept of “behavioral flexibility” which means being able to do the unexpected — being able to do things other people do not do. In the case of freelancers who are competing in the market with a lot of other freelancers it is important to stand out. From this perspective it is good to be doing things that your clients may not expect and may not get from other people. Konstantin also indicates that a good negotiator should also have confidence and that the way to achieve that confidence is to be certain about your position and of what you want from work and from life in general.

Konstantin believes that negotiation skills can be taught and that they are fun and very easy to learn. In his view, the problem with translators is that most of their communication is maintained via email and that most translators tend to work in isolated environments and are not used to face-to-face interactions with clients.

On the topic of striking a balance between work and life Konstantin mentions that the success of your business or even the quality of life that you have overall when talking about a balance depends on the kind of questions you ask yourself. The first big question that applies to all areas of like is “what do I actually want?” and the second question to ask yourself is “how do I get what I want?”.

On the topic of productivity, Konstantin explains that his approach to how translators can get more done is not so much related to translation technology but to adjusting your daily routine and habits to create a working environment and a working pattern that allows you to achieve very high levels of productivity. He emphasizes the fact that when you talk about productivity you cannot really separate things like work from rest and breaks. He firmly believes that a part of a healthy and sustainable daily routine has to include time off. He indicates that this pattern could help translators achieve a productivity level of 6000 to 8000 translated words a day.

Those interested in learning more about how to achieve high productivity levels and how to strike a balance between life and work should check Konstantin’s first blog post on this topic that will be published next Monday in this blog.

Listen to the interview with Konstantin  here: ProZ.com podcast, 2011-08-19

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Romina

Podcast: interview with Claudia Brauer on interpreting in the Global Village of the 21st Century 1

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

On August 16, the first online interpreting course in a new series of live online workshops designed for working and aspiring interpreters and linguists will be launched at ProZ.com so I interviewed Certified PRO member and ProZ.com trainer, Claudia Brauer, who will be in charge of some of these online courses to learn more about interpreting in the Global Village of the 21st Century.

At the beginning of the interview we talked about how technology has impacted the interpreting field. Claudia believes that interpreters should embrace technology as a tool to enhance their profession. She explains that today interpreters can provide valuable services of communication via cell phones, land lines and video Web-based technology. Face to face encounters are just one part of this mix.

On the other hand, consumers of interpreting services are also becoming increasingly sophisticated. She explains that interpreters are no longer confined to the face-to-face encounters. At present there are three rapidly growing fields: over-the-phone interpreting, also known as OPI,  video remote interpreting or VRI, which uses high-speed Internet video connections to provide visual access to interpreters in a different physical location and web-base oral communication.

Claudia indicates that the interpreting profession is growing at a rate of 22% per year higher than most of other professions.

She also describes the new series of live online workshops with lessons on a variety of Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) topics, designed for working and aspiring interpreters and linguists that will be available at ProZ.com on August 16. The online workshops will be offered in 15 sessions organized in 5 bundles of progressive knowledge acquisition.

As my last question, I asked Claudia what advice she would give to aspiring interpreters and she indicated that in her opinion to be a good interpreter one should:

  • be fast at making decisions,
  • have great interpersonal skills (including great patience and empathy)
  • be extremely familiar with the cultures of the languages one is interpreting,
  • develop a wide variety of technical skills.

She also believes that at the basis of interpreting a good interpreter should:

  • have full command of at least two languages,
  • be a very creative person and know how to improvise,
  • love learning and seek to learn something new every day,
  • develop their ability to listen, to speak in public and to take down notes,
  • study terminology and  glossaries,
  • enroll in a public speaking group,
  • practise speaking out loud, and
  • develop their memory.

Those interested in learning more about these online interpreting courses can check this link.

Listen to the interview with Claudia here: ProZ.com podcast, 2011-08-12

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Later!

Romina

Podcast: interview with Lori Thicke about Translators without Borders’ work and needs 3

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

After reading a recent article published on Speaking for Translators without Borders regarding an urgent call for volunteers, I thought it would be interesting to learn more about the work Translators without Borders are doing and their urgent needs, so I interviewed Lori Thicke, co-founder of Traducteurs sans frontières (TSF).

In this interview Lori explains what Translators without Borders is and how it all started in 1993. She describes the goals of the organization and how ProZ.com has helped. She also provides some stats regarding the number of translators who have volunteered, the number of languages and words covered so far and describes how the selection process works.

As a special note Lori explains what the urgent call for volunteers is about and mentions that, even though the need for translations is ongoing, Translators without Borders also have a need for volunteers who can make and/or edit videos, write articles, research funding programs, write grant applications, mentor translators in Africa, and of course translate.

They are also looking for LSPs who can evaluate tests in different languages using the automated testing platform ProZ.com has programmed for them.

Those translators who are interested in staying informed about Translators without Borders’ work can receive information on Translators without Borders’ website, subscribe to their Blog Speaking for TWB, or check their page on Facebook and follow them on Twitter  @translatorswb.

Listen to the interview here: ProZ.com podcast, 2011-08-05

I hope you enjoy this podcast.

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Later!

Romina

Podcast: Interview with Nataly Kelly on her role as Chief Research Officer with Common Sense Advisory and how freelancers can benefit from market research 1

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

This week I had the chance to interview Nataly Kelly, a respected author, consultant and advisor with a specialized interest in language services and technology and Chief Research Officer at Common Sense Advisory. In this interview Nataly explains what Common Sense Advisory does and describes her role as Chief Research Officer. She also shares some insight on her view about translation technologies and what may be in store for those language service providers who do not embrace technology.

Nataly has recently published a book about Telephone Interpreting, the first book ever written about this topic. In this interview she explains why she decided to write this book and mentions some of the topics covered in it. (To get a free digital copy of the book, click here.)

During the interview, I also asked Nataly to mention the ways in which freelancers could interact with Common Sense Advisory and benefit from its research. Listen to the interview here to learn how.

ProZ.com podcast, 2011-07-29

I hope you find this podcast interesting. You can follow Common Sense Advisory on Twitter @CSA_Research. Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Later!

Romina