Third ProZ.com podcast now available Reply

Hi there!

I’m happy to share with you the third ProZ.com podcast. ProZ.com podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement) . In this week’s podcast you will find:

ProZ.com podcast, 2011-05-13

The photos of this interview have been posted on the ProZ.com page on Facebook

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Have fun!

Romina

Background music:  Tafi Maradi by Kevin MacLeod

Membership: when and why should translators pay? 2

There was an inquiry this morning regarding a translator portal– to purchase membership there or not? I am copying here my reply, and would like to hear from others on this:

Hi Mike,

I’m not familiar with that site. I can give you some general advice when it comes to investing in membership at translator portals, and maybe others can add to this as well.

There are many sites which offer services for professional translators. Most of these will allow you to register and use some features or give you limited access to what they have to offer for free. What you get for free is not necessarily indicative of what the return on paid membership there will be, of course, but it can give you an idea.

I would recommend registering at several different portals, after doing some homework on each (a few Google searches can usually turn up pros and cons for a site, to begin with). Get what you need from each of those sites, no need to limit yourself to just one.

When it comes to opening your wallet for paid services for translators, make sure you’ve formed a clear idea of what you want in return. A membership fee should be viewed as an investment, and not necessarily a magic solution to get jobs– professional, well-paying clients look for professional translators (this does not mean that there is not room for other levels of translation work, see http://www.proz.com/?sp=rates&sp_mode=overview for an example of what I’m talking about), and you need to be able to show this in your online presence anywhere. Getting direct access to jobs is only a (small?) piece of the puzzle; keep in mind that networking, for example, can play an important part in building your online presence and in meeting new clients.

Ask other paid members on the sites where you’ve registered what they’re getting out of their membership. Ask more than one– most translators are more than willing to share this kind of info or to pass on a few pointers, and you may find that each person you ask is getting something different that they find valuable out of their membership (or not!).

Membership fees can differ from site to site, and it all depends on what you expect in return– is 150 bucks too expensive? If it leads to one new regular client, probably not.

Before paying for membership anywhere, also make sure it readily clear to whom you are making the payment (the person, persons or company behind the site or service), that the payment options are reputable, and what your options are for requesting a refund should you decide the service is not for you.

I know this doesn’t really answer your question, but I hope it helps.

What advice would you share with other translators or aspiring translators when it comes to the membership question? What steps should translators take to make those investments smartly?

Translation blogs: what does your top 5 list look like? 31

Silvina Jover-Cirillo (author of Lingua Franca Weekly)  brought another translator blog to my attention this morning, in the discussion for “Twitter for translators?”

There are a lot of translation-related blogs out there. Which ones do you follow? If you had to list your top five, blogs which are active and which you find useful or interesting to follow as a language professional, which would they be?

The Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 competition is on 1

Hi all!

I’ve just received the great news that ProZ.com’s page on Facebook has been nominated for the category ”Language Facebook Pages” at the Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 competition.

You can see the announcement here.

The nomination period goes from May 3rd to May 16th. You can visit this page to make your nominations.

Romina

The second ProZ.com podcast is here! Reply

Hi there!

I’m happy to share with you the second ProZ.com podcast. As previously announced these podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun. In today’s podcast you will find:

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

ProZ.com podcast, 2011-05-06

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Have fun!

Romina

Thanks to Ramiro Gonzalo in berimbau and Juan Zabala in pandeiro for the background music!

On translator rates Reply

There was a quick poll published this week on the subject of rates. While a comprehensive survey on translator rates which takes into account factors such as language pair, field, client type, etc., is beyond the scope of a quick poll, the discussion this poll led to is an interesting one. Have a look at the discussion thread here.

Another quick poll, held at the end of 2010 asked, “Are you planning to raise your rates in 2011?”  At least 24% of those who responded said yes, and nearly 39% were thinking about it, but not certain yet.

In response to a more recent quick poll, 18.8% of respondents stated they had raised their rates this year.

A different take on this topic might be to ask, “How’s your income?”  Have you been able to sustain or raise your income from your translation-related work, and was an increase or decrease in your rates a factor, just one of various factors, or not a factor at all?

Regarding rates, there is a brief explanation of how price relates to quality published on ProZ.com, as well as data on standard and minimum rates reported by those in the community. View this explanation and data here.