Profiles in interpreting: Giampiero Lungone, Italian – Spanish – English, industrial-technical interpreting 2

Giampiero Lungone is an industrial-technical interpreter in engineering training, working in Italian – Spanish – English. He recently joined the ProZ.com Interpreter Pool, one of the new pools of screened language designed to make it easier for clients to find experts. In this post, Giampiero talks about how he got started in interpreting, a bit about his work, and some considerations to keep in mind if you are thinking of starting a career as an interpreter.


 

570b5cf58ce4b7b52a5a0c0c3f0bf489.pngI started working as an interpreter almost by chance. I was already working as a translator and one day I received this call asking me to replace an interpreter who was ill. I had never done the job, but since this was a very good client and it was a two-day job, I decided to accept. And it opened a whole new world to me. I was really very nervous, but this first experience went extremely well. And it went so well that I have been doing it for the last 20 years. Basically, I accompany an engineer who delivers a training course for operation and maintenance of industrial machinery. These courses go so well that sometimes the trainees call me the “boss”, in the sense that without me the course could not be done.

 

I work translating from Spanish to English or Spanish to Italian and vice versa for both linguistic combinations. Spanish is spoken in 23 countries and each one has it own way of naming a certain piece of machinery. On the first days of training, the trainees are usually adapting to the course, to my voice, to the engineer. But after some days, we become friends and they start telling me that this is called this and that is called that. I always ask them to tell me the local names used in their work, so I can incorporate them in my work as an interpreter.

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The daily confrontation with distinct cultures and customs means that professional growth, especially in tackling hard times and situations (Patagonia, Argentina; Nigeria; Colombia), is constant. For example, the way one can explain something can be friendlier, whereas in other countries it would be better to be more formal. Another thing is that in warm countries the trainees might not be used to work long hours and sometimes a break can take a lot longer than 15 minutes, especially when you work in the plant. The trainees are sometimes called back to work for an emergency and the course has to wait for them. This can be a shock or considered as a negative aspect regarding the trust that is still building. My role is to mediate this whole situation. Furthermore, after working hours you confront yourself with the locals’ daily routines like driving, eating in local restaurants, going to the bank, etc. and you always have to remember that you are not in your country and you have to learn to do things as the locals do. If I can give some advice, always have some cash (dollars or euros) and credit cards and you will be fine in any part of the world.

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For an interpreter who works in this field, certain comforts are set aside, and it is a must to adapt to situations that are anything but comfortable. Once I stayed in a container with no running water (this is one of the reasons some places are not recommended for women). Another time I was in a hotel by the beach. Food can sometimes be challenging, especially when the local food is not quite acceptable (I have already contracted e. coli three times). And finding a good Italian restaurant can be very challenging too (I love Italian food). You simply cannot trust a sign written in Italian – like “La Pasta” or something of the sort. So, my recommendation is to always go to 5-star restaurants, especially if you like rare or slightly rare meat. A friend of mine contracted salmonella eating rare meat in a local restaurant. Trips usually last from one week to a maximum of three months, but then I am back home. It is always a great sensation coming back home and bringing along all those memories and experience the job offered me. There are always spectacular sunsets and breath-taking panoramas that will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Working hours are also challenging. Usually I start working from the moment I wake up until almost the moment I go to sleep. Accompanying someone on the job means to be by his side always, at least for the first days. Breakfast, lunch and dinner explaining the local food, getting him in and out of the installations, providing all the necessary tools to accomplish the work, and of course, delivering the training course! After 6 hours of work, you almost totally lose your concentration. Actually, in a training course, the interpreter is the first student the engineer trains, and he has to learn and understand everything in a very short period of time. Of course, I prepare myself before travelling with the material the client furnishes me and this is an enormous help. Personally, I think two breaks in the morning and one in the afternoon are enough to not make me lose my concentration and at the same time, rest. Too many breaks make me lose concentration and don’t help the trainees because it leaves them distracted.

Even in these cases, there is always something to learn about the people you work with and work for. I work in close contact with people and this inevitably gets us talking about so many things: local food, shops, language, politics, etc. But of course, I would never change this job because of everything it taught me to this day. And, I hope very much, to still discover other places and other situations or even go back to places I have already been to.

 


Thank you, Giampiero!

If you are a professional interpreter, you can use ProZ.com Pools™ to connect with new clients.

 

Translators Plus part 3: Get connected Reply

ProZ.com Plus membership comes with all the benefits members have come to know over the past nineteen years, plus a lot of new tools and opportunities designed with the serious freelance language professional in mind. This series takes a look at these additional benefits, one at a time.

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An advantage, and, let’s face it, sometimes a disadvantage, of the world we live in now is that everything is connected. Or it should be. Or could be.

On a professional level, this connectivity can be a great way to stay ahead. If you are in your CAT tool working on your latest project, why should you need to stop what you are doing and go somewhere else when you need help with a difficult term, for example? In another post I mentioned that you can send your query straight to the KudoZ term help network and get answers back without even leaving CafeTran Espresso, if you are using it. You can even get notified of future potential projects of interest while you are working on that project, and you have not left your CAT tool. You can log in to ProZ.com with your Facebook or Google account if you want to. This sort of inter-connectivity is what we have come to expect. Things that don’t connect to other things intelligently, that stand alone (not the same, obviously, as standing out!), will lead an increasingly lonely and inefficient life online nowadays. And basically, we are talking about how well you are reaching and serving your clients, right? How many hoops does a potential client need to jump through to find out about what you have to offer, and contact you for work? Are you making it as easy as possible for this contact to happen?

Many of the tools included in your ProZ.com Plus subscription are geared towards allowing you to more efficiently be seen, be screened, and be contacted by potential clients. Now with a click, a client can call or otherwise contact you from the directory or your profile. You can choose to receive priority messaging from potential clients, on your computer or on the go via ProZ.com Mobile. You can show clients current and past projects in real time, allowing them to see you are an active pro and to further verify your areas of expertise, in your profile, or on your website. You can provide the option for potential clients to add you to their lists of interesting candidates, on ProZ.com and on the web in general.

The “call me” button

If you have configured a way for someone to call you, a “call me” button will appear in your profile and in your directory listing. Clicking the button will open a window that shows any contact information you’ve chosen to share, and provides a “click to call” option to authorized users.

Get the “Call me” button »

Click to call

With the “click to call” feature you can allow authorized people to phone you, while keeping your phone number private.

If configured, a “Click to call now” button will appear in your “call me” box during the times you’ve specified. The caller will use a browser-based app to call your phone number (you will talk on your phone, while the caller will use the browser-based app). Your phone number will not be revealed to the caller.

Set up “Click to call” »

Widgets

The “What I’m working on” feature allows you to share projects you are working on, creating a project history as you go. Clients can search and find language professional through their “What I’m working on” histories. It’s also a great way to network with colleagues!

You can add a “What I’m working on” widget to your own website, to show potential clients the kind of work you do, in real time.

Check out the widgets available so far »

 

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If you already have a Plus subscription, be sure to refer to your Plus subscriber checklist to see what you can do to get the most out of your investment.

If you are still considering membership at ProZ.com, this is the full list of membership benefits.

If you have questions or need help, feel free to drop me a line.

Participate online in Elia Together 2018 (free for Plus subscribers) Reply

As you may have already heard, the European language industry association (Elia) and ProZ.com have teamed up to broadcast this year’s event, Together 2018Together is an annual two-day event from Elia, where language service companies and independent professionals convene for open dialogue on industry trends, to learn mutually-relevant new approaches, to update technical skills and, ultimately, develop lasting relationships to serve their end clients better. This year, the event will be held on February 22nd and 23rd.

If you are a ProZ.com Plus subscriber, you will have access to the broadcast and recordings from this year’s event for free.

All you have to do is:

  1. Make sure you are logged in to your ProZ.com account.
  2. Go to ProZ.com/TV at https://www.proz.com/tv/Together2018 (also found under the “Member activities” section of the site menu).
  3. Enjoy.

Elia Together 2018

This event has been approved for up to 7 ATA Continuing Education points. Important: in order to earn CE points, you must click the “Get credentialed” button on the timer above the video player on https://www.proz.com/tv/Together2018.

Translators Plus part 2: Smart translators and interpreters are wearing sunglasses Reply

ProZ.com Plus membership comes with all the benefits members have come to know over the past nineteen years, plus a lot of new tools and opportunities designed with the serious freelance language professional in mind. This series takes a look at these additional benefits, one at a time.

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The future looks bright for a certain type of translator, interpreter, or anyone providing language services.

These are the language professionals who are able to adapt to the changes that affect us all in general, and the changes that affect how things work in the industry. Some of these changes are related to globalization, some are tech-based, others have to do with how we have come to expect a service to be delivered, in terms of time, cost, and quality, and very often without even having met the person or persons providing the service.

Tomorrow’s translator and interpreter is continually improving. They are staying up to date on what’s new, both good and bad. They are able to accurately inform their clients about what’s new, what the best solution might be, and deliver a service that really meets those clients’ needs. They are learning and incorporating the technology, processes, and tools that allow them to do this.

That brings us to today’s topic: watching videos on the internet.

Wait! Did you just open a tab and go to YouTube to watch cats and dogs doing funny things?

1. You did the right thing,
2. Stick with me a bit, because I was talking about something else.

Call it what you want– professional development, continuing education, training, “what every professional should be doing”– tomorrow’s translator and interpreter is taking in new information about all different aspects of the business, and putting it to work for them, in order to stay on top of their game.

ProZ.com has been offering language professional training for more than ten years, and the ProZ.com community is full of experts on all different facets of the business. This expertise and knowledge has been collected in the new Plus subscriber video library. If you want to learn more about translation software, or the art of translation or interpreting, or negotiating with clients, or finding new clients, or a particular field within translation and interpreting, the video library is a good place to start. It’s free with your ProZ.com Plus subscription, and you can watch what you want when you want, on your computer, tablet, or mobile phone.

At the moment, the video library contains over 1,000 hours of content, in various languages. If you were to pay for access to all of that content separately, it would run you around 20,000 USD, which, even if you have that kind of money just burning a hole in your pocket, you’re going to want to spend it on something else, right? Granted, not every course in the library will be of interest or applicable to you, as tends to happen with most libraries. But it could be a very valuable professional resource to have in your set of tools, and again, it’s free with your Plus subscription. And as the number of Plus subscribers grows, so grows that library of knowledge.

If you have not had a look yet, I encourage you to check it out, at http://videos.proz.com/

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If you already have a Plus subscription, be sure to refer to your Plus subscriber checklist to see what you can do to get the most out of your investment.

If you are still considering membership at ProZ.com, this is the full list of membership benefits.

If you have questions or need help, feel free to drop me a line.

Translators Plus part 1: Cats drinking coffee? Reply

ProZ.com Plus membership comes with all the benefits members have come to know over the past nineteen years, plus a lot of new tools and opportunities designed with the serious freelance language professional in mind. This series takes a look at these additional benefits, one at a time.

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Today we’re going to talk about… cats drinking coffee!


Well, not quite. Maybe later. I’m curious about how that little guy reaches the cup, or if he takes it with sugar.

I meant to say we’re going to talk about a CAT tool that comes with ProZ.com Plus membership, by the name of CafeTran Espresso.

First, some CAT tool basics for those who may not be initiated. Computer-Aided Translation (CAT) software are programs that translators use to create their translations. CAT tools can use and generate translation memories (TMs), which the translator leverages for efficiency and quality in their translation. Upwards of 90% of translators use a CAT tool. Of those using a CAT tool, around 80% use more than one tool. If you are wondering which CAT tools translators are using most, this article may be of help.

If you are on the market for a CAT tool, you get one for free with your Plus subscription: CafeTran Espresso. The latest version of CafeTran Espresso, Acua, was released this year.

Even if you are not currently looking for a new CAT tool, this is a good opportunity to test drive something different to see how it compares to the tools you are currently using, and to add it to your arsenal if it works for you.

CafeTran has all the features you would expect from a CAT tool, and possibly some you would not! It is interoperable with files for Trados, memoQ, Wordfast, and other major CAT tools. It also integrates with ProZ.com services– you can keep an eye on job offers, or get KudoZ term help, right from within your CAT tool.

Support for CafeTran comes from the software’s developer himself, as well as an extensive knowledge base for those just getting started, and the CafeTran group, made up of users helping each other and also guiding feature development.

See more about what CafeTran can do at https://www.cafetran.com/#features

Your Plus subscription provides you with a floating license to CafeTran. This means that no matter where you install or use CafeTran, all you need to do is log in with your ProZ.com account to activate the full set of CafeTran features. Versions are available for Windows, OS X, and Linux.

You can also download and try out CafeTran for free to see if you like it at https://www.cafetran.com/.

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If you already have a Plus subscription, be sure to refer to your Plus subscriber checklist to see what you can do to get the most out of your investment.

If you are still considering membership at ProZ.com, this is the full list of membership benefits.

If you have questions or need help, feel free to drop me a line.

See what ProZ.com Plus has to offer »
 

Guest post: Paula Ribeiro on APTRAD’s 2nd international conference (May 17 – 19) Reply

Translation challenges over the next decade and how to address them

Today’s guest post was written by Paula Ribeiro – president and co-founder of the Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters (APTRAD). Paula is a long-time ProZ.com member and part of the Certified PRO Network. APTRAD will be holding its second international conference on May 17th, 18th and 19th in Porto, Portugal.


APTRAD, the Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters, was established in February 2015 by a group of freelance professionals in response to a perceived need for a modern, creative and innovative approach in order to achieve greater cohesion and exchange of information at a national level within the profession. After almost one year of hard work we are proud of achieving some of the important goals we initially set.

APTRAD’s motto – Interpreting the present to translate the future – reflects the Association’s aim to promote and foster the growth of its professional members, and to support the integration as professionals of all future translators and interpreters into the market.

Pursuing this thought, APTRAD is to hold its 2nd International Conference from 17 to 19 May 2018 in Porto, Portugal – a bilingual event full of opportunities to explore, learn, share, and of course network! The conference, based on the theme Translation challenges over the next decade and how to address them, will explore the challenges of a professional freelance translator and/or interpreter during the next decade and how to address and overcome them.

As in 2016, where we welcomed more than 300 participants from all over the world, we are all trying to turn this event into a big party for translators, interpreters and linguists in general joining us in our beloved hometown – Porto.

The organization of this event becomes much easier with the valuable help of our partners, in which ProZ.com is included as an essential reference in the career of so many professionals. Thank you for your support!

Feel free to visit our website at and more specifically the conference website and drop us a line if you need help or some extra information about the event!

And if you are still considering, see what participants had to say about APTRAD’s 1st International Conference in 2016 here.

Also, and because an event is just not work time, be sure to check out the amazing fringe events awaiting you in Porto

See you this May! We promise you an unforgettable event and lots of fun!

For more information:

APTRAD website: www.aptrad.pt

APRTRAD conference: www.aptrad.pt/conference/conference

Facebook event page: www.facebook.com/events/2019483394940324/


About Paula RibeiroPaul Ribeiro

Paula Ribeiro started translating in 1997, and since then she knew that this was the career she wanted to pursue! She graduated in 2006 with a Master’s Degree in Specialized Translation and Interpretation with English and French as her working languages, and later Spanish as her third language. She is currently pursuing a postgraduate degree in Computer Assisted Translation.

In 2010, Paula decided to create her own company – Crossingwords – and to undertake translation and interpretation as her main occupation, always maintaining her education and training as a key part of her professional and personal development.

As an event organizer, Paula has planned several conferences on both a national and international scale, including the 2013 ProZ.com International Conference.

Since February 2015 Paula has been one of the founders and the President of APTRAD, the Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters, a formally constituted non-profit organisation based in Porto.


Participate in this new survey on CAT tool use 1

There is a new survey on CAT tool use open now. It is designed in part as a follow up to a study on CAT tools that was released in 2013:

  1. CAT tool use by translators: who is using?
  2. CAT tool use by translators: what are they using?

If you have a few minutes to share your input, it would be appreciated.

Participate in the survey here >>

Thanks!