ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: winners in interpreting Reply

There were some great candidates as well in the interpreting-related categories for this year’s ProZ.com community choice awards. Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to everyone who participated!

 

Blog: Best overall blog related to interpreting.

A Word in Your Ear – Lourdes De Rioja

 

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole.

Yes, conference interpreting is a thing – Liz Essary

 

Website: Best overall professional interpreter’s website.

http://alessandravita.com/ – Alessandra Vita

 

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

@translationtalk – (An initiative by @adrechsel and @jeromobot)

 

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

Interpreters & Translators Network

 

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

Troublesome Terps – Alexander Drechsel, Alexander Gansmeier, Jonathan Downie

 

Conference speaker:

Judy Jenner

 

Full list of 2018 nominees:

Blog: Best overall blog related to interpreting.

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole. This category may include guest blog posts:

Website: Best overall professional interpreter’s website.

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

Conference speaker:

 

See also: ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: winners in translation

ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: winners in translation Reply

The results are in. Thank you to everyone who nominated candidates, and all who voted in this year’s Community choice awards. Here are the winners in the translation-related categories:

 

Blog: Best overall blog related to translation.

Thoughts on Translation – Corinne McKay

 

Website: Best overall professional translator’s website.

http://transcreativity.com/ – Patricia Mora

 

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

@erik_hansson – Erik Hansson

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

Things Translators Never Say

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

Marketing Tips for Translators

Trainer: Active trainer in in-person or online training.

Tess Whitty

 

Article: Best article published (online or in print form).

When the Unthinkable Happens and Giving Up Work Isn’t an Option – Nikki Graham

 

Book: Best book published (print or digital format). May include re-releases or new editions.

Finding and Marketing to Translation Agencies: A Practical Guide for Freelance Translators – Corinne McKay

 

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole.

“Dealing with PDF files during a translation project” – Nancy Matis

 

ProZ.com profile: Most professional/attractive ProZ.com profile.

Alexander Manaenkov – Games, Apps, Web | manoftranslation.com

Most helpful contributor: All-around contributions, be they in forums, in term help, on social media, etc.

Sheila Wilson

 

 


 

Full list of 2018 nominees:

Blog: Best overall blog related to translation.

Website: Best overall professional translator’s website.

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

Trainer: Active trainer in in-person or online training.

Article: Best article published (online or in print form).

Book: Best book published (print or digital format). May include re-releases or new editions.

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole. This category may include guest blog posts.

ProZ.com profile: Most professional/attractive ProZ.com profile.

Most helpful contributor: All-around contributions, be they in forums, in term help, on social media, etc.

 

See also: ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: winners in interpreting

Interview: Tees for Translators with Stefanie Sendelbach Reply

stefanie_sendelbach

 

Stefanie Sendelbach is an English and Portuguese to German translator specializing in marketing and IT. She is a long-time member of ProZ.com and a part of the Certified PRO Network.

Stefanie is also the creator of Tees for Translators, which showcases t-shirts designed with the translator, interpreter and language lover in mind.

 

 

Tell me about yourself as a translator. How did you get started? What are your main areas of specialization?

I have an MA in Translation Studies from FTSK Germersheim, Germany, and I have been working as an independent translator for English-German and Portuguese-German since 2003, the same year I became a ProZ.com member. I specialize in translating technical contents such as user manuals for audio systems, cars, IT hardware, cameras, and all kinds of household appliances. Besides dealing with such texts that demand accuracy, rationality, and consistency, I also enjoy the creative spark of marketing and transcreation projects as well as website and software localization. Feel free to visit my website for more information about me and my background.

What got you started with the t-shirt designs for translators? How does your work as a translator “translate” into this activity?trust_me_im_a_tanslator

I often see people around me confuse the concepts of “translation” and “interpretation”. In fact, this happens throughout all the cultures and languages I am involved in, i.e. English, German, and Portuguese. So I assume the problem is global, and more visibility and education are urgently needed.

I have been a member of BDUE, a professional association of interpreters and translators in Germany, for many years, and I hail their efforts in creating awareness for our profession. Other translator and interpreter associations around the globe do the same kind of work, and I am extremely thankful for their effort and great ideas.

Ce_MomentNow I am happy that I could come up with an idea of how I can use my creativity to contribute to a growing awareness and visibility of the language mediator trade: I started creating t-shirt designs related to translation, interpretation, and language-related themes. Some are serious, some are funny, but all are intended to be worn and seen by others so that we can proudly show who we are and what we do. Check out my Facebook page and my Instagram account “Tees for Translators” where you can always find my most recent designs.

Thanks to many years of networking with colleagues and other language lovers, I could accumulate a deep understanding of the self-conception of translators, interpreters, and language nerds, as well as the many jokes and jibes regarding our trade. I hope to be able to “translate” this knowledge into fun and inspiring designs for all of us.

To celebrate International Translation Day, the designs are now on sale for a super discount (only for a limited time).

What do you plan to be doing on International Translation Day?Happy International Translation Day

I usually just work on International Translation Day while following some of the events happening on ProZ.com in the background. This year, September 30 falls on a Sunday, so I might actually do something else rather than translating. Hopefully I will be enjoying the idea of many colleagues all over the world happily sporting their new translation t-shirts and thus contributing to more visibility for our profession.

 

Thanks, Stefanie!

 


translator

Keep Calm and Love Grammar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Find Stefanie and her creations:

ProZ.com profile: https://www.proz.com/translator/62663

Tees for Translators

on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Tees4Translators/

on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tees4translators/

 

ProZ_640X360

Who are 2018’s most outstanding translation and interpreting professionals? You decide. Reply

Every year since 2013, the ProZ.com community choice awards are held to place a spotlight on language professionals who are active, influential or otherwise outstanding in various media, in both translation and interpreting. Nominees and winners are determined entirely by the ProZ.com community.

See previous winners of the Community choice awards »

Nominations are open now for this year’s awards. You can nominate as many people or resources as you wish in seventeen different categories

Add your nominations now at https://www.proz.com/community-choice-awards

Voting will open before the end of September.

 

 

 

Marketing for freelance translators and interpreters who hate marketing Reply

no_more_wheat_karen

A recent survey of freelancers centered around their marketing efforts showed some interesting finds:

  • 55% of freelancers spend 3 hours a week on their online marketing efforts
  • 51% of respondents considered marketing too time-consuming, and 41% felt marketing was too costly
  • 83% are investing financially in online marketing of some sort
  • 72% say they are spending less than but up to 100 USD a month in marketing (those who spend more than that report earning more)
  • The average survey respondent had reached their income goal within two years of starting out

The survey sample were some 2,000 US freelancers of all types, so it is reasonable to expect those numbers to be somewhat different if we narrow it down to translators and interpreters, expand the sample to other countries, or both.

One number in particular that caught my eye was the monthly investment in marketing. 100 USD a month sounded pretty steep to me, but maybe I’m wrong. 1,200 USD in freelancer marketing a year. Do you spend that much on your marketing? If so, drop me a line, I’d be very interested in hearing about it and if you find it to be a good investment.

If you are already a paying ProZ.com member, you are spending between 12 and 18 dollars a month on marketing through your membership, though you get all the rest of the tools and opportunities available along with it. It’s a kind of marketing that is easy to do, what we’d call passive marketing.

Be an ant, not a grasshopper

For some kinds of work, sending CVs, applications, emails, calling or meeting potential clients, printing business cards or flyers, posting ads, and all of that active marketing, can be effective. Many freelance translators and interpreters find that kind of marketing tiring, frustrating, and also expensive, both in terms of money and time. You’d rather be translating or interpreting, right?

You may have to rush to do active marketing if you suddenly find yourself short on clients or workload. This tends to happen when a freelancer has no kind of marketing in place while they are fully-booked, a bit like the grasshopper who watched the ant stock up for winter, unworried during the summer because food was plentiful, and then sorely unprepared for the winter.

Passive marketing is your ant stocking up for winter. It can help save you from the unexpected, even though work might be plentiful now. And sometimes it’s a gateway to new opportunities that can pop up and replace what you’ve got going on with something even better.

Where is your shop window?

As I said, passive marketing is easier to do, if you do it right, and the time/monetary investment is quite different too. It basically consists of opening up a brightly-lit shop window (your online presence) on a bustling street. Many people walk by, window shopping, but if your shop has the right goods (your services, expertise, samples, things that make you stand out), shoppers will pop in to look and talk to you. Some will be interested in buying now, some will simply make a note of your shop for when they do need what you have to offer.

Where is that bustling street, though? Well, ProZ.com is one of them. You should have a professional online presence in any serious work-related venue for language professionals (a profile on LinkedIn, for example). But since ProZ.com is the busiest street when it comes to searching for and finding language professionals, if you are not figuring there as prominently as possible, you are definitely missing out on client contact. So that ProZ.com membership, roughly the cost of a new pair of shoes per year, is all you need to keep your shop window on the busiest street in the industry.
where_is_your_shop
Check your directory ranking in your top language pair and area of expertise. What page of the results are you on? How many pages of results will your ideal client browse through to get to you? They say, “The best place to hide a dead body is on page 2 of Google search results.” Directory results work in a similar way. Chances are, by the time a client has gone a few pages in, they’ve already found the people they are looking for.

Don’t waste my time

Now, when I say “online presence” I don’t mean having a profile registered on a place and having the bare minimum of information filled out there. Nowadays, if I’m looking for a service/service provider online, I don’t even look twice at people who have not put some time investment into presenting their services. No picture? No thanks. No real name? See ya. No details about the services you offer or why I should choose you? Don’t waste my time! This is where the time investment comes in. It’s mostly an up-front investment. Put in the time to craft that presentation, then go do whatever else you want, and let it go to work for you in the background.

Now think about your two biggest clients…

I’ve got all the clients I can handle right now, no need, you might say. OK! But how many times would you try to go back to a shop that was closed every time you went there?

Now, think about your two biggest clients. Would you be in trouble if tomorrow, through no fault of your own, you lost those two clients? If so, why not put your shop window out there, and occasionally field an inquiry from an interested potential client? The worst that can happen is that you’ll make some new contacts while you’re working, and heaven forbid your fully-booked status should change, you’ll have some good leads to work with.

What’s in your shop window?

Now go over to your ProZ.com profile. At the top of your profile you will see a link to “Force visitor view”. Click on that. What you see is what any visitor to your profile will see when they are evaluating working with you. Put yourself in the shoes, or eyes, of your ideal client. Does what you see there look professional, attractive, keep your interest, “sell” you on the idea of contacting this person with a work offer? Does it speak to that person’s strengths, what makes them different from the competition?

shop_window
By the way, if you are looking for ways to build, update, or fine tune your online presentation, many of the same principles of decorating a real shop window apply! Thinking about it this way may also help get your creative juices going. If you need some inspiration, you can find some pointers here:
https://www.appearhere.co.uk/inspire/blog/how-to-dress-your-shop-window