Improved messaging and invitations in the translation center powered by ProZ.com Reply

New features and tools have been added to the translation center powered by ProZ.com and made available to ProZ.com Business members

Improved messaging

  • Messages can now be posted from a work order or a job, addressed to all players or to administrators or even to individual translators. You can also filter the messages exchanged based on their visibility.
  • It is also possible to reply to messages directly from the “last messages” tab in the dashboard, including the messages posted by translators from the page where jobs are offered to them.

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Improvements to invitations

  • Several improvements were introduced to the pages used for inviting and assigning translators to accept a posted job, including a more intuitive navigation among them.
  • When a team or a set of providers are picked for the queue of a job, all other eligible providers can now be added to the queue, in case the originally selected translators did not accept the invitations.
  • You can have invitations sent manually to this team, selecting how many invitations should be sent at time and the minutes between batches of invitations. Translators can also be manually invited from the pool.
  • You can modify the order of translators in that pool by clicking and dragging their names up or down, send messages to translators, manually add or remove translators to the list of candidates for invitation and even deactivate an invitation already sent.
  • Invited translators will access a page where they will have access to the available information and will be able to exchange messages with the job posters.
  • Depending on the configuration selected when the job was created, invited translators will be able to directly accept a task, or the assignment will be manually done by the job posters (generally based on the messages received from the invited translators).

blog_invitations

Clients and teams

  • Teams are a powerful feature in the translation center, that lets you group your service providers in accordance to whatever criteria you select, in such a way that any service provider can be in none, one or many teams. Whatever is needed for your operation.
  • It is now possible to associate a client with a given team, either as a preset value or as a forced option, so that when a PM (or even a contact from the client) creates a work order, the translators contacted will belong to the team pre-selected for the client in particular.

blog_job_options

Other improvements

  • It is now possible to upload files of up to 25 MB, up from a previous 10 MB limit.
  • Instructions can now be posted in projects, work orders and jobs, and they will be also presented to translators in the page where the assignments are offered to them.
  • Providers are now presented in a tabular format, alphabetically sorted, with page sizes of 15, 50 or 100 translators per page. A link to the translators’ ProZ.com profile is provided.

The translation center powered by ProZ.com is used by Translators without Borders and several commercial translation companies to deliver millions of translated words every month. This platform is made available to all ProZ.com Business members. If you want to learn more about this platform, please submit a support request and I will contact you.

5 Translation Conferences you might attend in 2017 1

Pieter_Beens
Pieter Beens is a freelance translator and copywriter working in English to Dutch, and a frequent guest contributor to the Translator T.O. 

In this post, Pieter takes a look a few upcoming events for translators in 2017.


January has already come to an end. It’s February now and the conference season is about to start. In this article I present to you 5 translation conferences you might attend in 2017. They’re presented in order of date, so this overview can still be helpful if the first few are already past.

The benefits of attending a translation conference

Translating generally is a silent job. Many of us do not regularly meet clients or colleagues in daily life. At the same time it can be difficult to cope with all the changes in the industry or simply have a fresh view on what you’re doing or using day after day. Visiting a translation conference can be a good idea then. They offer you opportunities to meet like-minded colleagues from all over the world. As the conference often takes two or more days, there are a number of sessions, combined with some great relaxing opportunities. So there’s always something to take home for every participant: if you don’t like one presentation, it is compensated for by another.

And then there is the networking part of conferences. During conferences you’re drawn into discussions with forum members, fellow participants and providers of industry-leading software or tools (who in many cases sponsor the organization of the conferences). So don’t forget to take your business cards and networking apps, and exchange your details.

Translation conferences to attend in 2017
elia

EliaTogether, February 23-24, Berlin

EliaTogether is one of the biggest industry events in the European Union. Together is hosted by Elia, the European Language Industry Organization. It is held in a different city in Europe each year. This year it will take place in Berlin on February 23 and 24. The programme contains sessions for translators and interpreters, as well as for freelancers and agencies. Last year more than 300 participants were present, so it will be a huge event.

Registration is still possible. Rates are available at http://2017.elia-together.org/rates/

 

Translation and Localization Conference, March 24-25, Warsaw

tlc

The Translation and Localization Conference in Warsaw is unique. It hosts 350+ guests from all over the world (last year there were 30+ nationalities). The programme is both aimed at translators and interpreters. The TLC is held in Novotel Hotel in Warsaw, a great place to stay with a multitude of options to relax and enjoy great presentations. The location is good as are the facilities.

The TLC is organized by a couple of volunteers from the translation industry. They succeed each year in setting up a great event with several interesting tracks. Visit www.translation-conference.com/ for more information.

 

BP17, May 4-6, Budapest

bp

The Business and Practice Conference in Budapest is a yearly event that is aimed at freelance translators. It is organized by a translator and hosts a schedule full of masterclasses and business related presentations. All professionals that have a say at the conference are people with real hands-on experience as a translator. They therefore share their own knowledge and experiences, which makes this conference great for starters who want to learn more as well as for seasoned translators that want to network and share knowledge. The BP conference is also a kind of promotion for Hungary as the organization offers plenty time to learn to know the capital of Hungary.

Check out the full schedule at http://bpconf.com/

 

FIT Congress, August 3-5, Brisbane

fit

The International Federation of Translators hosts a conference every two years. The flagship conference will happen this year again. It welcomes translators, interpreters and other industry professionals to have their say about disruption and diversification.

The call for papers is still open, so you can try to secure your spot for hosting your own presentation at http://www.fit-ift.org/brisbane-2017/

 

ATA58, October 25-28, Washington D.C

ata

ATA58 is the 58th conference of the American Translator Association. It will be held in Washington D.C. this year. Each year the organization chooses a different location, but all conferences have in common that they are beyond spectacular. It is a typical American conference in that it is big and bold. There is room enough for networking possibilities, while there are also opportunities to meditate, fitness and relax.

During the conference there are options to pass the ATA examination, and the presentations are full of information for translators and interpreters alike.


ProZ.com
 Conference?

If there is a chance, ProZ.com tries to host its own conference each year. In the past the company held conferences in Rotterdam, Stockholm and other interesting cities. The ProZ.com conference is organized by volunteers from the massive translators and interpreters community with support of ProZ.com. This year’s conference is still unknown, but if there will be one it would certainly worth to visit with it’s great sight-seeing and networking opportunities and hands-on knowledge sharing.

rotterdamrotterdam2

Other translation conferences in 2017

Of course there are many more translation conferences to be held in 2017. They are spread over the whole world and have varying knowledge levels, networking and relaxing opportunities and price tags. Visit an overview of translation conferences in 2017 at https://www.vertaalt.nu/blog/translation-conferences-2017/


Guest post: 10 things translators need to know about machine translation 2

Meet Gwenydd Jonesa freelance Spanish to English translator and professional trainer. She has two MAs, the first in Translation Studies and the second in Legal Translation, and the DipTrans (CIOL). With 10 years’ experience, Gwenydd specializes in business, marketing and legal translation. She is also a copywriter.

Learn more about Gwenydd and some of the courses she offers by checking out her blog, translatorstudio.co.uk.


I don’t know about you, but I spend much of my life going from one translation project to the next. I want to learn about translation technology, but am always putting it off. Not my idea of fun. For me, m1074712_r55e018418b6a3achine translation is like the hologrammatic elephant in my home office.

Last June, I had to prepare a talk for the ProZ.com conference in Stockholm. Finally, an opportunity to confront the elephant. I set out to find answers to my questions, hoping to put my worries to rest. I wanted to find out: what is going on with machine translation? Is it a real threat to human translators? And if it is, what should we be doing about it?

In my webinar Your Essential Machine Translation Briefing, on 8 Feb, I’ll share what I found out. From the perspective of a technically challenged freelancer. In the first half, I’ll give you a summary of what is currently going on in machine translation. Then, I’ll share the strategies I’m employing in my work, to make sure I develop alongside automated translation. See you there!

In the meantime, here are a few things freelance translators need to know about machine translation.

  1. ‘Machine translation’ isn’t the same as ‘translation memory’ or ‘CAT tool’

Sometimes translators get these terms muddled up, which is understandable. A computer-assisted translation (CAT) tool is an application where you can write your translations. It uses translation memories (TMs) to keep a record of all your past work. Don’t confuse that with a machine translation (MT) engine. An MT engine is an application that automatically translates a text. You can integrate MT with your CAT tool, but they are two different pieces of software. They have different functions.

  1. Machine translation is more effective with certain text types

Since computers rely on data and rules, the more predictable a text, the better the output will likely be. Formulaic and simple texts work well. Creative and complex texts don’t. Life sciences, finance, IT and other technical genres lend themselves to machine translation. But while financial accounts are formulaic, an accountant’s blog is far less predictable. With the second, you may well be faster on your own, particularly if you use voice recognition.

  1. Machine translation engines get better results when they’re customised

Translators and companies that are serious about machine translation aren’t using Google Translate. They get their own machine translation engines and train them for a specific domain. They do this by inputting their translation memories. After that, they input more data on an ongoing basis, so the machine keeps adapting to them. This is how they get more accurate output. Then they post edit it and feed the final translation back into the machine. With a suitable text type, this helps them finish the translation faster than if they did it from scratch.

  1. Neural machine translation is a major change in the translation industry

The world of machine translation is starting to harness deep learning. This is based on neural networks. Neural networks have lots of uses in artificial intelligence. Language processing is one of them. So, computer scientists can use them to improve machine translation. Companies that are using neural machine translation include: Google, Microsoft and Facebook.

  1. Google Translate is now using neural machine translation in some language combinations

Google recently announced that it is using neural machine translation in Google Translate. For now, it is limited to certain language combinations. They rolled it out with a total of eight language pairs. All are to and from English, combined with French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Turkish. It’s free, but remember the data is public, so you can’t use it if you’ve signed a confidentiality agreement. Google Translate isn’t customised (see point 3), but it has lots of data. The jury is still out on how good the updated tool is.

  1. You can subscribe to your own machine translation engine and train it

You may not realise that companies that develop machine translation engines sell subscriptions. You can even pay to train your own engine using your translation memories. Post-editing isn’t just about an agency sending you texts. You can learn how to post edit, get a customised engine and then do whatever you want with it. The profits and control will be all yours.

  1. Companies that sell machine translation are battling for your business

If you want to try machine translation, you have to go shopping for a provider. The different companies that offer machine translation solutions (including SDL, Lilt and Systran) publish data to show how effective their software is. It’s all quite technical and confusing. And it can be biased. You can go to TAUS and the eMpTy Pages blog, for unbiased information.

Perhaps, like me, you prefer to see for yourself. One way of doing this is to observe yourself for a month in your work, and see how many words you average per hour. Then, pick whichever machine translation software takes your fancy and use it for a month. Track your turnover to see whether your hourly average gets faster or not. Then you’ll have your own data to tell you whether it’s worth continuing to invest.

  1. Machine translation isn’t currently replacing human translators

Improvements in machine translation don’t mean we’re all out of a job. But, it may mean our jobs will start to change. Commercial translation is often about getting an acceptable translation as quickly as possible. You can complete some texts faster by using customised machine translation and post-editing. And sometimes that is what the customer wants. As machine translation continues to get better, we can expect demand for post-editing to grow.

  1. Machine translation pricing isn’t set in stone, yet

While machine translation has a long history, it’s still being consolidated in our industry. Lots of translators and translation agencies are struggling to get their heads around it. Some translators are concerned that post-editing means lower pay. Certainly, ruthless agencies will try to use it as another way of driving prices down.

But, that doesn’t mean smart translators can’t use it to increase their profitability. Why shouldn’t we earn more on the days we work as post editors? If we learn about it, and talk about it, we’ll soon know how we want to price it. We’ll know when to refuse a job. Translators can choose to accept post-editing jobs only when they’re going to make more money for their time.

  1. Freelance translators have options regarding machine translation

We don’t all have to go running for the hills before the robots attack. Becoming a post editor is just one option open to us. If you like the idea of it, you could post edit for agencies. But, you could also subscribe to your own engine and use it in your work. If you don’t want to post edit, there are a host of specialisation and diversification options.

Whatever path you end up choosing, now is a good time to get informed and come up with a plan. If major changes do take place in our industry, I for one will be ready for them. Ready to adapt. To continue being the one who controls my career. To protect my rates, serve the direct customer competitively, and understand the jobs (and prices) agencies offer me.

I encourage you to join me at my webinar on 8 Feb, Your Essential Machine Translation Briefing. I’ll share everything I’ve found out about machine translation, in simple, unbiased terms. I’ll also tell you the strategies I’ve come up with, and am now employing in my work. Sign up here!

Standing out in the translation jungle with Fi2 n Co Reply

Your ProZ.com profile is your business card to the world. It forms part of your online presence that provides in-depth details on your language services, and is a space you can use to distinguish yourself as a professional. But out of over 800,000 profiles on ProZ.com, how do you set yourself apart from the rest?

In this video, ProZ.com professional trainer Fi2 n Co describes one way in which you can leverage the features available in your ProZ.com profile to stand out in the translation jungle, so to speak: by adding extra tabs to further customize your profile and provide more information about your background, experience, field of expertise, credentials, or professional services.  



Profile sections mentioned in this video:
Your profile
Settings tab
Custom tabs

Be sure to keep an eye on Fi2Pro’s YouTube channel for more useful tips and tutorials. More videos coming soon!


Interested in learning more on how to use your ProZ.com profile to meet new clients and stand out from the crowd? Join an upcoming webinar on “Meeting clients at ProZ.com” to learn some tips and tricks on getting the most out of the site, as told by a ProZ.com site staff member. These sessions are held regularly and are completely free to attend.

ProZ.com Business membership as a promotional tool Reply

The corporate badge

ProZ.com Business membership includes the benefits associated with Professional membership, such as unlimited Blue Board access, plus a set of tools and opportunities available exclusively to Business (formerly Corporate) members.

As is the case with the Professional membership, the Business membership keeps evolving to provide more value to the translation companies that chose this path of growth.

Many of these tools and opportunities provide operational advantages, such as the translation center currently used by several members to deliver millions of words to their customers, the employee profiles and improved risk management tools.

Other advantages have to do with premium service, such as the immediate posting of jobs, Blue Board arbitration and priority response to support requests, including phone support.

This note will deal with a separate set of tools and opportunities aimed towards providing promotional opportunities, based on the principle that all promotional tools for outsourcing companies will be focused on ProZ.com Business members.

A first tool is the privileged positioning given to Business members in the Translation agency and company directory, the industry’s busiest directory for finding language service providers (over  400 daily connections between language services buyers and providers).

Also, only Corporate members may apply for inclusion in the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network, giving them increased credibility,  visibility and promotion

Among the tools already released, a new promotional box (displayed below) is now  presented in the Blue Board records of Business members, as well as in the jobs posted by them.

bb_corp_header

As another example, currently being developed, is a code for a portable badge will be provided to Business members in order to let them display on other pages, such the company’s corporate web page, the average Likelihood of Working Again with them entered by its service providers. This is similar to the badge provided to Translators Without Borders volunteers.

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The above are just a few instances of many changes to come, where the logo of Business members will be presented every time the companies are displayed on ProZ.com, and relevant ranking tables will be made exclusive for Business members.

An investment in ProZ.com Business membership  provides value today and well into the future. Let’s all grow together!

 

Ranking your ProZ.com profile: A tutorial by panelist Triston Goodwin 1

I recently had the pleasure of moderating a panel discussion entitled “What makes a great ProZ.com profile” during the Marketing & Recruitment day of ProZ.com’s annual virtual event series. During the session, co-panelists and outstanding ProZ.com members Fernanda Rocha and Triston Goodwin provided many tips and suggestions on how to get the most out of your presence on the site in order to attract more clients and find work. But, for as much as we were able to cover during the discussion, both panelists still had a lot more to say on the subject.

In the video below – made shortly after the panel – Triston describes other strategies to leverage your presence on ProZ.com to find work both on and off the site. What he describes is the concept of parasite ranking – which is, in Triston’s words, a technique used “to rank a page from another website that has really good metrics for a keyword that you want to rank for, then use that ranking to send people back to you.” Learn more in this tutorial:



Profile sections mentioned in this video:
Tagline
About Me
CV/Resume
Portfolio
Search Engine Optimization tab:

Title tag
Keywords (Focus on long-tail keywords!)
Preferred URL format

Suggested resources:
https://moz.com/researchtools/ose
http://kwfinder.com


Many thanks to Triston for this great tutorial on how to harness the power of effective SEO to improve your chances of meeting more (and better) clients!

Interested in learning more? Be sure to keep an eye on Triston’s newly-created YouTube channel aimed at helping language professionals grow their businesses online.

The translation center now offers in-platform invoicing and communications during the assignment of tasks Reply

Two important features have been added to the translation center powered by ProZ.com and made available to ProZ.com Business members.


In-platform invoicing

The translation center now includes the tools needed for you to assign a purchase order to each task in the translation center. These purchase orders can then, once the corresponding tasks have been completed, be used by the service providers to submit you the corresponding invoices through the system. The company can them approve or reject invoices, keep track of the accounts payable, mark invoices as paid and be notified of late payments.

Purchase orders

A purchase order (PO) can be easily created for each task to be assigned to a service provider, including:

  • Information such as preferred currency, payment terms and payment conditions can be entered in the translation center settings and taken automatically from there for each purchase order
  • Service provider and date of assignment, taken directly from the workflow information
  • Scope of the assignment, taken from the job information
  • Information on rate, units, volume and total amount, selected when the PO is created. Units can be selected as source or target words, source or target lines, pages, hours and minutes. It is also possible to import an SDL Trados analysis, as displayed below.

Example of TC PO

 

The purchase orders menu

The Finance → Purchase orders menu option will present to the service providers all the purchase orders associated with tasks assigned to them, with information that includes PO number, date of assignment, scope, assignment status, invoice (when issued) and associated amount. There are menus for searching among the POs and also to locate assigned tasks that do not have a complete PO associated with them.

When used by the company that manages the translation center, this option will present the same information for all service providers that have or had tasks assigned to them.

The invoices menu

The Finance → Invoices menu option will present to the service providers all the invoices they submitted through the system, including the invoice number, due date, included POs, approval status, payment status and money amount. There is a tool for searching invoices and a button to submit an invoice.

This last tool will enable the association of several POs in a single invoice, provided that all are expressed in the same currency and have the same payment terms. A due date will be automatically calculated. The service provider will also be able to submit an actual invoice in digital format.

When used by the company managing the translation center, this option will present the same information for all service providers. In this case there are no provisions for the creation of an invoice. By opening the page corresponding to any invoice it will be possible to edit the approval status (approve, edit, reject) and to mark it as paid.

Communications during the assignment of tasks

At the critical moment of assigning tasks to service providers, the translation center had only two options:

  1. Offering the task to a team of providers, and let any of them to accept the task and have it assigned
  2. Manually assigning the task to a provider

In none of these cases was it possible for service providers to communicate with the job poster, and this translated in an operation with little flexibility and that had to rely on communications managed outside the platform.

This has changed. When you create a work order and you define the conditions to post your jobs in any of the selected language pairs, you will find the new options (the default selection is stored in the translation center settings to save you time when creating the work orders):

Task assignment options

The first condition corresponds to the current situation, where any invited service provider will be able to accept a task. This is the best alternative when you have a tight deadline and want the file accepted as soon as possible.

The second option is totally new. Instead of an acceptance button, the invited service providers will be only able to post messages (for instance letting you know about their availability and interest) and you will be able to manually assign any of the tasks to any of your qualified service providers.

In both cases invited translators will be able to communicate with you even when they have still no task assigned (this is also new) and you will be able to post messages visible to all invited translators or to any particular provider, and to follow a conversation as seen by any of the invited translators.

 


If you are a ProZ.com Business member, or consider becoming one, and want to learn more about the translation center powered by ProZ.com, please contact me via email or submit a support request.