ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: winners in interpreting Reply

There were some great candidates as well in the interpreting-related categories for this year’s ProZ.com community choice awards. Congratulations to the winners, and thank you to everyone who participated!

 

Blog: Best overall blog related to interpreting.

A Word in Your Ear – Lourdes De Rioja

 

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole.

Yes, conference interpreting is a thing – Liz Essary

 

Website: Best overall professional interpreter’s website.

http://alessandravita.com/ – Alessandra Vita

 

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

@translationtalk – (An initiative by @adrechsel and @jeromobot)

 

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

Interpreters & Translators Network

 

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

Troublesome Terps – Alexander Drechsel, Alexander Gansmeier, Jonathan Downie

 

Conference speaker:

Judy Jenner

 

Full list of 2018 nominees:

Blog: Best overall blog related to interpreting.

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole. This category may include guest blog posts:

Website: Best overall professional interpreter’s website.

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

Conference speaker:

 

See also: ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: winners in translation

ProZ.com community choice awards 2018: voting now open, pick your favorites Reply

 

Thanks to everyone who made nominations for this, the sixth annual ProZ.com community choice awards. Voting is now open, so be sure to check out the nominees and cast your votes for your favorites in the categories for translation and interpreting at https://www.proz.com/community-choice-awards

Translation-related nominees:

Blog: Best overall blog related to translation.

 

Website: Best overall professional translator’s website.

 

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

 

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

 

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

 

Trainer: Active trainer in in-person or online training.

 

Article: Best article published (online or in print form).

 

Book: Best book published (print or digital format). May include re-releases or new editions.

 

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole. This category may include guest blog posts.

 

ProZ.com profile: Most professional/attractive ProZ.com profile.

 

Most helpful contributor: All-around contributions, be they in forums, in term help, on social media, etc.

 

Cast your votes in the translation categories here »

 


Interpreting-related nominees:

Blog: Best overall blog related to interpreting.

 

Blog post: For a single blog post, as opposed to the “blog” category, which is based on a blog as a whole. This category may include guest blog posts:

 

Website: Best overall professional interpreter’s website.

 

Twitter: Best overall Twitter account.

 

Facebook page/group: Best overall Facebook page or group.

 

Podcast: Best podcast (series or single podcast).

 

Conference speaker:

 

Cast your votes in the interpreting categories here »

 

Thank you in advance to all who vote, and best of luck to everyone who is in the running!

CCA_2018_header_voting

 

Tablet interpreting, remote interpreting platforms, and tips and tricks for interpreters Reply

Since 2009, ProZ.com has hosted an annual, free, online event for language professionals in celebration of International Translation Day (ITD), September 30th. You can see past events at ProZ/TV. The name of the day notwithstanding, interpreters also deserve some of the spotlight at these events! Here is a selection of some recorded sessions from past ITD events which may be of interest to you if you interpret, or are considering getting into the interpreting field…


Tips, tools and apps to make the most of a tablet while interpreting

In this video from the 8th annual ProZ.com International Translation Day conference held online, interpreters Alexander Drechsel and Josh Goldsmith talk tablets and how interpreters can leverage them for their work:


The evolution of remote interpreting platforms

Also from the 8th annual International Translation Day celebration, Barry Olsen provides this overview of emerging technologies and platforms enabling remote interpreting:


Tips & Tricks for Remote Interpreters

Claudia Brauer is an English – Spanish translator, interpreter, trainer, conference speaker, and member of the Certified PRO Network. In this video, she shares some tips and approaches to help remote interpreters:


If you are a professional interpreter, you can use ProZ.com Pools™ to connect with new clients.

Profiles in interpreting: Giampiero Lungone, Italian – Spanish – English, industrial-technical interpreting 2

Giampiero Lungone is an industrial-technical interpreter in engineering training, working in Italian – Spanish – English. He recently joined the ProZ.com Interpreter Pool, one of the new pools of screened language designed to make it easier for clients to find experts. In this post, Giampiero talks about how he got started in interpreting, a bit about his work, and some considerations to keep in mind if you are thinking of starting a career as an interpreter.


 

570b5cf58ce4b7b52a5a0c0c3f0bf489.pngI started working as an interpreter almost by chance. I was already working as a translator and one day I received this call asking me to replace an interpreter who was ill. I had never done the job, but since this was a very good client and it was a two-day job, I decided to accept. And it opened a whole new world to me. I was really very nervous, but this first experience went extremely well. And it went so well that I have been doing it for the last 20 years. Basically, I accompany an engineer who delivers a training course for operation and maintenance of industrial machinery. These courses go so well that sometimes the trainees call me the “boss”, in the sense that without me the course could not be done.

 

I work translating from Spanish to English or Spanish to Italian and vice versa for both linguistic combinations. Spanish is spoken in 23 countries and each one has it own way of naming a certain piece of machinery. On the first days of training, the trainees are usually adapting to the course, to my voice, to the engineer. But after some days, we become friends and they start telling me that this is called this and that is called that. I always ask them to tell me the local names used in their work, so I can incorporate them in my work as an interpreter.

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The daily confrontation with distinct cultures and customs means that professional growth, especially in tackling hard times and situations (Patagonia, Argentina; Nigeria; Colombia), is constant. For example, the way one can explain something can be friendlier, whereas in other countries it would be better to be more formal. Another thing is that in warm countries the trainees might not be used to work long hours and sometimes a break can take a lot longer than 15 minutes, especially when you work in the plant. The trainees are sometimes called back to work for an emergency and the course has to wait for them. This can be a shock or considered as a negative aspect regarding the trust that is still building. My role is to mediate this whole situation. Furthermore, after working hours you confront yourself with the locals’ daily routines like driving, eating in local restaurants, going to the bank, etc. and you always have to remember that you are not in your country and you have to learn to do things as the locals do. If I can give some advice, always have some cash (dollars or euros) and credit cards and you will be fine in any part of the world.

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For an interpreter who works in this field, certain comforts are set aside, and it is a must to adapt to situations that are anything but comfortable. Once I stayed in a container with no running water (this is one of the reasons some places are not recommended for women). Another time I was in a hotel by the beach. Food can sometimes be challenging, especially when the local food is not quite acceptable (I have already contracted e. coli three times). And finding a good Italian restaurant can be very challenging too (I love Italian food). You simply cannot trust a sign written in Italian – like “La Pasta” or something of the sort. So, my recommendation is to always go to 5-star restaurants, especially if you like rare or slightly rare meat. A friend of mine contracted salmonella eating rare meat in a local restaurant. Trips usually last from one week to a maximum of three months, but then I am back home. It is always a great sensation coming back home and bringing along all those memories and experience the job offered me. There are always spectacular sunsets and breath-taking panoramas that will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Working hours are also challenging. Usually I start working from the moment I wake up until almost the moment I go to sleep. Accompanying someone on the job means to be by his side always, at least for the first days. Breakfast, lunch and dinner explaining the local food, getting him in and out of the installations, providing all the necessary tools to accomplish the work, and of course, delivering the training course! After 6 hours of work, you almost totally lose your concentration. Actually, in a training course, the interpreter is the first student the engineer trains, and he has to learn and understand everything in a very short period of time. Of course, I prepare myself before travelling with the material the client furnishes me and this is an enormous help. Personally, I think two breaks in the morning and one in the afternoon are enough to not make me lose my concentration and at the same time, rest. Too many breaks make me lose concentration and don’t help the trainees because it leaves them distracted.

Even in these cases, there is always something to learn about the people you work with and work for. I work in close contact with people and this inevitably gets us talking about so many things: local food, shops, language, politics, etc. But of course, I would never change this job because of everything it taught me to this day. And, I hope very much, to still discover other places and other situations or even go back to places I have already been to.

 


Thank you, Giampiero!

If you are a professional interpreter, you can use ProZ.com Pools™ to connect with new clients.

 

Open road interview series: Eszter Lelik. Interpreter, translator, winner of a new car 2

Eszter Lelik

Eszter Lelik is the subject of this latest installment in the Open road interview series. Eszter is an English to Hungarian interpreter and translator from Hungary, and was also the grand prize winner of a new Nissan Juke. Her win was announced on 10 January, 2017 in a live broadcast from ProZ.com headquarters in Syracuse. Congratulations, Eszter! On to the interview:


Q. First, the most important question: Where’s the first place you will go in your new car?

Well, I wish I could go on a longer trip with the new car but this is a very busy season for me as interpreter and translator so I can think in terms of a short ride only. So I decided to go to Lake Balaton and visit some friends there.

Q. Now, from your website I see that you have over twenty years of experience as a translator and interpreter. What kind of changes have you noticed in your work and in the industry during the course of your career?

In the course of the past 23 years as it is quite understandable many things have changed. When I started my career, a few years after the political transition here in Hungary, very few people could speak and did speak foreign languages. There was a high demand for interpreters and also for translators in my case, as I worked at that time at one of the Big 6 companies mainly due to the privatization processes where all the documents had to be translated into English. Now, more than 20 years later a new generation grew up, these young people, or rather their parents, realized the importance of foreign language skills so the majority of them speak English, but quite often a second foreign language as well. The multinational companies use English as their corporate language (even if it is e.g., a German company), thus the need for translation has greatly decreased. Nevertheless, considering my specific areas of expertise and the fact that I am doing mainly simultaneous interpreting, plus working not only in English but also in German, I am optimistic about my personal perspectives.

Q. You’ve interpreted for some impressive brands and organizations. What do you find most rewarding about your work as an interpreter?

To become an interpreter has always been my dream. Now, more than two decades after the start of my career I am still certain that I have the best job in the world, at least the right one for me. I like independence, intellectual activity, constant learning, and travelling, always meeting new and interesting people. I have worked for/with famous politicians, celebrities, artists and I sometimes I am amused by realizing that most of them have already disappeared from the public life, from the stage, and I am still here.

Q. Are you optimistic about the future of the language industry?

In my previous answer I have mentioned already what I think of my own future, the future of my career. To be quite honest I am not optimistic at all concerning the future of the language industry in general. With all the translation memories, interpreting gadgets and the obsession with saving money on everything to the detriment of the quality, I think in about 10 years’ time lots of translators and interpreters will be left without any assignment, or paid much less than today.

Q. The theme of this campaign was ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?

Open Road for me means new challenges, opportunities and many new things to explore.  I think in our profession constant learning has to be the first priority. Thus, for me, deepening my knowledge in some specific areas, like medical and legal areas, is very important. Learning the use of CAT tools would be also necessary and also modernizing  my website is there on my agenda.

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Thanks Eszter for your time, and congratulations once again!

All interviews in the Open road series can be seen at http://www.proz.com/open-road.

This September, all roads lead to Curitiba! Reply

Today’s guest post author is Sheila Gomes – a freelance translator with over 20 years of experience who currently specializes in software localization and video games. Sheila is the manager of Multitude – an online information portal for translators and interpreters, and is one of the founding members and organizers of  TICWB – a networking group for local industry professionals.

Along with fellow freelance language professional and industry contributor Isabel Vidigal, Sheila is the co-organizer of this year’s ProZ.com regional conference in Brazil, which will take place this September from the 23rd to the 25th in the city of Curitiba. She shares her post today in Portuguese.


Minha primeira conferência de tradutores e intérpretes foi no Rio de Janeiro, em novembro de 2011: a III Conferência Brasileira de Tradutores do ProZ.com. Como foi a edição com o maior número de participantes até então, imagine o assombro da pessoa perdida entre mais de 300 colegas, com dezenas de apresentações e outras atividades para participar. Acabou virando a primeira de uma série: o bichinho dos eventos T&I tinha me mordido e hoje vou a todos que posso. Até chegar ao ponto de organizar em conjunto com a Isabel Vidigal o nosso evento do ProZ.com. A Isabel é veterana de eventos, já organizou inclusive a primeira Conferência do ProZ.com no Brasil, junto com a Rosana Malerba, em agosto de 2009. E agora o evento vem pra Curitiba, num dos poucos casos de saída do eixo Rio-São Paulo. Nesta minha cidade do coração, que acabou virando um polo de referência para tradutores e intérpretes por causa do trabalho ativo que temos aqui com iniciantes e veteranos, em vários projetos e ações. Estamos ansiosos e com vários planos para receber os colegas!

Assim como é para muita gente, o ProZ.com foi meu primeiro passo para conseguir clientes internacionais e fez uma grande diferença na minha carreira. Claro, é um grande recurso, mas funciona de verdade quando fazemos nossa parte, depois de estarmos preparados, de ter pesquisado o mercado e aprimorado as qualificações profissionais. O próprio site oferece uma série de ferramentas para isso, e tentei aproveitá-lo o máximo possível para aprender e também contribuir. Assim também é com a VI Conferência Brasileira do ProZ.com, que estamos organizando aqui em Curitiba entre os dias 23 e 25 de setembro: tentamos devolver um pouco do que conseguimos por meio do portal e oferecer outras oportunidades de fazer networking, receber treinamento, estabelecer discussões e momentos de socialização, para tradutores e intérpretes, iniciantes ou veteranos, e outros interessados na área.

Creio que uma das ações mais eficazes para mudar o mercado é dar acesso a iniciativas educacionais aos profissionais em formação e outras pessoas interessadas em ingressar nessa nossa área tão rica, mas também ainda pouco conhecida do grande público. É por isso que o desenvolvimento profissional inspira o tema do evento, “Boas práticas e caminhos”. Além de palestras e mesas-redondas, o evento oferecerá atendimento especializado individual ou em pares, na forma de miniconsultorias, para profissionais já atuantes e estudantes que buscam informações para se profissionalizar. E como a descontração é importante para estimular a integração dos pares, além do próprio evento, teremos encontros informais e passeios culturais.

Aliás, Curitiba é ideal para encontros assim, especialmente para tradutores e intérpretes, pois o que mais temos por aqui é: café! Espaços simpáticos, pitorescos, convidativos a cada esquina, dos maiores e festivos aos menores e aconchegantes, não faltam lugares para todos os tipos de grupos ou apenas para um bom papo entre duas ou três pessoas. E para quem vem, mas já sabe que pode ter que trabalhar também, praticamente todos os espaços oferecem wifi, além de alguns outros espaços de acesso gratuito como a biblioteca pública (a uma quadra do local do evento) ou algumas praças. Isso sem contar restaurantes, bares, espaços culturais e outros eventos para conhecer e investir no networking até fora do evento.

É por essas e muitas outras que esperamos você aqui: em setembro, todos os caminhos levam a Curitiba!


Meet Sheila and all of the excellent speakers who will be present at this conference – like keynote speakers Marta Stelmaszak and Paula Ribeiro – by registering today on the main event page: http://www.proz.com/conference/686

Registration fees can now be paid in the local currency! The early bird price has been extended so those who are interested in paying in reais at this discounted price may do so. Don’t delay! Prices increase in just a few short days, on July 23rd. More information about paying locally can be found on the event page under the “Opção de pagamento em reais” heading.  

Want to learn more about what to expect at this conference? Program highlights are featured in this short video:

Advocating for translators and interpreters worldwide: An interview with Maya Hess of Red T Reply

“The world cannot function without translators and interpreters.” This is the opening statement of a petition created in part by Red T, a U.S.-based non-profit organization that lobbies on behalf of translators and interpreters working in conflict zones. The objective of this initiative is to draw attention to the plight of linguists who work in high-risk settings, and to urge the United Nations to take measures to ensure that these individuals receive a certain degree of protection in their duties.

In this interview I had the opportunity to speak with Maya Hess, CEO and founder of Red T, about the goal of this petition, the organization behind this project, the risks associated with working as a linguist in conflict zones, and what can be done to help lobby on behalf of translators and interpreters worldwide.


MK: First of all, congratulations on this initiative. The petition has reached almost 35,000 supporters. Can you tell me about Red T, the organization behind this project?

MH: Thank you for your kind words and the opportunity to introduce Red T to your platform.

The goal of the petition is to urge the UN to protect translators and interpreters worldwide

Red T is a nonprofit organization advocating for translators and interpreters (T/Is) in high-risk settings, whether these are conflict zones, sites of political unrest, detention camps, prisons housing violent extremists, or even terrorism trials. Having worked in the terrorism arena for many years, I experienced firsthand how vulnerable T/Is can be and founded Red T to draw the attention of the public, governments, and other bodies to the often terrible fate they suffer. Ultimately, Red T’s vision is a world in which members of our profession can work free from fear of persecution, prosecution, imprisonment, abduction, torture, and assassination. To achieve this, we engage in various activities championing policies that support and safeguard linguists. In our latest project, the petition you referred to, we are seeking protected-person status for T/Is in conflict situations. Together with the five major international language associations – the International Association of Conference Interpreters (AIIC), the International Federation of Translators (FIT), the International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters (IAPTI), Critical Link International (CLI), and the World Association of Sign Language Interpreters (WASLI) – we are calling on the United Nations to issue a resolution along the lines of those adopted for journalists. As it stands now, T/Is are not specifically protected as a professional category, and obtaining such a resolution would constitute an important first step in remedying this omission.

MK: What can language professionals who are interested in supporting Red T do? How can they get involved?

MH: Right now, we are looking to gather at least 100,000 signatures for the petition. To reach that goal, we hope your readers will sign (either by going to red-t.org or https://www.change.org/p/urge-the-un-to-protect-translators-and-interpreters-worldwide) and disseminate it to everyone they know via Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. To get the UN to listen, we need critical mass. Also, by circling the world with this petition we can raise awareness about what T/Is do and how important our work is. As we say in its introduction, “The world cannot function without translators and interpreters.”

Another way to support Red T is by donating, which can mean making a contribution or volunteering your time. For instance, we have a great demand for writers to do research and draft copy and would be grateful for any assistance in that regard. We are also looking for translators for the Conflict Zone Field Guide for Civilian T/Is, which we issued jointly with AIIC and FIT. It still has to be translated into a number of languages, so if you are able to help, please email us at contact@red-t.org.

MK: Has Red T encountered resistance in certain sectors while seeking to protect linguists at risk?

MH: It depends. Some of our projects have been embraced: For example, our coalition’s UN Resolution proposal has been taken up by Baroness Jean Coussins in the British Parliament’s House of Lords and has received the support of H.E. Bernardito Auza, the Apostolic Nuncio and Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the United Nations, who committed to promoting it before the UN Security Council once it is scheduled for debate. Additionally, the Conflict Zone Field Guide has been used as a reference in the British Ministry of Defence’s publication “Linguistic Support to Operations” and in a Danish think-tank’s policy recommendations to the Danish government. Other efforts, such as our Open Letters, in which we urge governments across the world to do the right thing vis-à-vis T/Is, are not always that welcome. We imagine that’s because it is uncomfortable to be reminded of a moral imperative.

Overall, though, once people learn about the current state of affairs for T/Is in conflict situations, the most common reaction we encounter is shock at how unprotected linguists are in this day and age.

MK: What advice would you give to someone thinking about going into this line of work?

Red T’s mission is to protect linguists who work in high-risk settings

MH: I would encourage T/Is who are planning to work in high-risk settings to professionalize as much as possible. As is common in these settings, the individuals drawn upon to serve as linguists have little or no translation/interpreting experience. So, it is very important that they learn the basic skills of the profession and familiarize themselves with their rights and responsibilities. The latter is critical, since employers frequently ask for help with tasks that go beyond the job description and T/Is need to know they can decline any request that makes them uncomfortable. In fact, clearly defined expectations on both sides go a long way, and consulting our Conflict Zone Field Guide (http://red-t.org/guidelines.html) – a primer that lays out best practices, standards, and ethics for T/Is and their employers – is a good starting point. Overall, we believe that adhering to the parameters of the profession serves a protective function, and the more professionalized a T/I is, the safer he or she will be.

MK: You talked in the past about the need for a paradigm shift in how translators and interpreters are perceived. Could you elaborate?

MH: In high-risk settings, especially conflict zones and terrorism-related contexts, T/Is are too often and too quickly perceived as traitors. The results of this perception, or what I call the translator-traitor mentality, are catastrophic and include criminalization of our profession under the cover of due process, wrongful incarcerations, rashes of kidnappings, incidents of unspeakable torture, and brutal murders, not seldom in the form of beheadings. In other words, T/Is may get persecuted for simply doing their job. This must stop. And that is why we need a paradigm shift to change the way we are perceived and treated. I hope your readers will join me in bringing this about by signing and circulating our petition. Together we can make this happen!


About Maya

Maya Hess is the CEO and founder of Red T

Maya Hess is the founder and CEO of Red T, a U.S.-based nonprofit organization that advocates worldwide on behalf of translators and interpreters in conflict zones and other high-risk settings. As a forensic linguist, Maya provided language support and expert witness services in many high-profile terrorism trials, among them those related to the simultaneous US embassy attacks in East Africa, the World Trade Center bombing, and the New York City landmarks conspiracy. She holds an M.A. in Journalism from New York University, a Graduate Certificate in Terrorism Studies from John Jay College of Criminal Justice, as well as an M. Phil. and Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the City University of New York.

You can find Red T on the web at red-t.org, and on Twitter @TheRedT