Participate online in Elia Together 2018 (free for Plus subscribers) Reply

As you may have already heard, the European language industry association (Elia) and have teamed up to broadcast this year’s event, Together 2018Together is an annual two-day event from Elia, where language service companies and independent professionals convene for open dialogue on industry trends, to learn mutually-relevant new approaches, to update technical skills and, ultimately, develop lasting relationships to serve their end clients better. This year, the event will be held on February 22nd and 23rd.

If you are a Plus subscriber, you will have access to the broadcast and recordings from this year’s event for free.

All you have to do is:

  1. Make sure you are logged in to your account.
  2. Go to at (also found under the “Member activities” section of the site menu).
  3. Enjoy.

Elia Together 2018

This event has been approved for up to 7 ATA Continuing Education points. Important: in order to earn CE points, you must click the “Get credentialed” button on the timer above the video player on

Guest post: Paula Ribeiro on APTRAD’s 2nd international conference (May 17 – 19) Reply

Translation challenges over the next decade and how to address them

Today’s guest post was written by Paula Ribeiro – president and co-founder of the Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters (APTRAD). Paula is a long-time member and part of the Certified PRO Network. APTRAD will be holding its second international conference on May 17th, 18th and 19th in Porto, Portugal.

APTRAD, the Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters, was established in February 2015 by a group of freelance professionals in response to a perceived need for a modern, creative and innovative approach in order to achieve greater cohesion and exchange of information at a national level within the profession. After almost one year of hard work we are proud of achieving some of the important goals we initially set.

APTRAD’s motto – Interpreting the present to translate the future – reflects the Association’s aim to promote and foster the growth of its professional members, and to support the integration as professionals of all future translators and interpreters into the market.

Pursuing this thought, APTRAD is to hold its 2nd International Conference from 17 to 19 May 2018 in Porto, Portugal – a bilingual event full of opportunities to explore, learn, share, and of course network! The conference, based on the theme Translation challenges over the next decade and how to address them, will explore the challenges of a professional freelance translator and/or interpreter during the next decade and how to address and overcome them.

As in 2016, where we welcomed more than 300 participants from all over the world, we are all trying to turn this event into a big party for translators, interpreters and linguists in general joining us in our beloved hometown – Porto.

The organization of this event becomes much easier with the valuable help of our partners, in which is included as an essential reference in the career of so many professionals. Thank you for your support!

Feel free to visit our website at and more specifically the conference website and drop us a line if you need help or some extra information about the event!

And if you are still considering, see what participants had to say about APTRAD’s 1st International Conference in 2016 here.

Also, and because an event is just not work time, be sure to check out the amazing fringe events awaiting you in Porto

See you this May! We promise you an unforgettable event and lots of fun!

For more information:

APTRAD website:

APRTRAD conference:

Facebook event page:

About Paula RibeiroPaul Ribeiro

Paula Ribeiro started translating in 1997, and since then she knew that this was the career she wanted to pursue! She graduated in 2006 with a Master’s Degree in Specialized Translation and Interpretation with English and French as her working languages, and later Spanish as her third language. She is currently pursuing a postgraduate degree in Computer Assisted Translation.

In 2010, Paula decided to create her own company – Crossingwords – and to undertake translation and interpretation as her main occupation, always maintaining her education and training as a key part of her professional and personal development.

As an event organizer, Paula has planned several conferences on both a national and international scale, including the 2013 International Conference.

Since February 2015 Paula has been one of the founders and the President of APTRAD, the Portuguese Association of Translators and Interpreters, a formally constituted non-profit organisation based in Porto. hackathon in 2017, and the site team bids farewell to one of its key members 5

There was a bit of a flurry of activity in the third week of October as various members of the site team gathered in Syracuse for a second hackathon.

The team gets together to brainstorm, discuss, plan and work on the hackathon projects.

For those not already familiar with the term, a hackathon is short event where developers and others get together to work intensively on one or more projects, with the goal being the creation of usable software, services, or other features. The first hackathon was held in July of 2016, and resulted in the creation of the What I am working on feature, in which to date just over 19,000 entries have been made.

This year, the team broke off into smaller groups to tackle four different potential services:

* The announcement of this project was made to the Certified PRO Network forums and will only be accessible if you are a member of the network.

A big thank you goes out to all the site members who made themselves available on short notice to participate in testing some or all of these potential services, and provided feedback which will help determine the value and direction of each.

Group photo. We’re not a bad-looking bunch, for the most part.

A hackathon is a lot of work for everyone involved. For a group as culturally and geographically diverse as the site team, it is also an excellent opportunity for team building, to work face to face with coworkers who are usually in another country and/or time zone, and to get to know each other better, both professionally and personally. And it is a lot of fun! Despite the long days, the team still made room for other activities: group breakfasts, lunches, dinners and drinks, a bit of walking and talking around the town of Syracuse, and some team members might have been spotted in impromptu ping pong and football matches (not at the same time).

There was still time to get together at the end of the day, socialize, and talk plans for the next day.

In addition, this hackathon included the celebration of the impending retirement of Enrique Cavalitto, who many may know from his seventeen years on as site user, member, moderator, conference speaker, powwow attendee, and staff member of eleven years.

Enrique’s retirement party. There may have been a tear or two in the room.

Enrique helped start and oversee the Argentine office of, spent years coordinating with Translators without Borders, and more recently has been coordinating the development of the translation center, a service available to Business members on the market for ways to improve the management of their translation projects. As part of the celebration, Enrique was inducted into the Hall of Fame. I don’t think you’ve seen the last of him on, though. Best wishes in whatever comes next, Enrique!

Enrique and Jared at the Tech Garden, home to the Syracuse offices of


Community choice awards: Have you voted yet? Reply

Voting is open in the 2017 community choice awards through the end of July. If you haven’t seen the great people and resources nominated this year, you can do so here. Be sure to cast your votes for your favorites. And check out this short video about the awards, by member and CCA nominee Fi2Pro:

Open road interview series: Carl Brunet Reply

This is the final interview featuring members who have won Apple Watches as part of the site’s year-end membership campaign.

Congratulations to all of the winners!

Carl Brunet is the subject of today’s interview. Carl is a translator working in English and French, specializing in international relations, trade, marketing, environment, and finance, among other fields. He currently resides in Ottawa, Canada.

Q. Are you optimistic about the future of the language industry?
I’m optimistic in that people will always increasingly want to communicate and so there is a role for language professionals, but sometimes technology is imposed upon us and does not make the job necessarily easier.

Q. What’s the most rewarding part of your career as a freelance translator?
Having the freedom to call the shots, work as much as I want, where and when I want to. I’m currently on holiday in France.

Q. How has being a member of helped you meet your freelance objectives?
I have found some interesting jobs on the platform, gained valuable experience with some of the largest companies in the world and it is motivating to see so much work available if I want it.

Q. The theme of this campaign is ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?
I want to keep going down the path I’ve chosen, building my business and work on marketing myself better now that I’ve gained greater experience working for a huge variety of public and private sector clients.

Open road interview series: Frederique Griffith Reply

Today’s interview features Apple Watch winner Frederique Griffith. Frederique is a certified medical interpreter working in French to English and vice versa. She currently resides in Saint Louis, Missouri.

This is one of the final interviews conducted as part of’s year-end membership campaign. All prize winners have been selected, and you can find the full list of winners here. A special congratulations to our grand prize winner, Eszter Lelik, who won a brand new Nissan Juke!

See all previous posts in this series »

Frederique Griffith working from her home in Saint Louis.

Frederique Griffith working from her home in Saint Louis, Missouri

Q. Your profile indicates that you’re a medical interpreter. What do you find more rewarding – translating or interpreting?
I have been interpreting for several years now and really enjoy it. People are very grateful for the service provided. Whether they are filling out a form, seeing a doctor or interviewing for immigration, it is always reassuring to foreigners to have someone next to them who understands them. It is a pleasure to help people communicate that way. Translation is different as I don’t interact with people directly.

Q. Are you optimistic about the future of the language industry?
I am optimistic because people are traveling, moving and doing business across borders more and more easily and will always need quality work done in translation. Machine translation is far from being the equal of human work. Quality is important and cannot be attained cutting corners and using machines.

Q. How has being a member of helped you meet your freelance objectives?
I have learned quite a bit from I have listened to several webinars, purchased a software at the group price, consulted the Blue Board to check on possible jobs and used the terminology glossary site quite a bit. Seeing and reading my colleagues’s viewpoints in the discussion forums is also very helpful.

Q. The theme of this campaign is ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?
I hope to do a little more translating as I transition from interpreting, where I spend a lot of time driving to and from appointments. Over the Phone and Video Interpreting also allow me to cut back on travel time. I enjoy the challenge that represents the translation of a document. I plan on increasing my knowledge of CAT tools and taking advantage of the online library available to members.

Open road interview series: Gudrun Dauner Reply

Gudrun Dauner is a freelance translator based in both Philadelphia and Munich. A native German speaker, she translates primarily from English and Italian into German and specializes in the field of art history.

Gudrun is the twelfth Apple Watch winner in’s year-end campaign giveaway. See all interviews in this series here.

Gudrun at her home office in Munich

Gudrun at her home office in Munich

Q. How did you initially start working as a translator?
I was always fascinated by foreign languages and cultures, and so parallel to my studies in art history in Germany I enrolled in language programs in other countries, mostly in Italy. After finishing my Ph.D. I worked on Italian Renaissance drawings at the State Graphic Arts Collection in Munich and then curated an exhibition on the same topic for the Rosenbach Museum & Library in Philadelphia. While attending the opening of this exhibition I learned that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies in Washington, DC was looking for German translators to work on an encyclopedia. I worked for a few months on that project and found I loved it for two main reasons. First, I was glad to have a chance to put my language skills to productive use. Second, translating for publications is in essence what I did for many years as an art historian: looking for the best possible way to express a concept. So in a way, it was by chance that I started working as a translator back in 2005, but it “clicked” very quickly. In spring 2006, I registered at, which helped me build up a loyal client base in my field.

Q. From the details in your profile it looks like you have worked on some very interesting projects. Which one was your favorite?
It is hard to pick one favorite project, but in general I enjoy working on long-term projects, where I can learn a lot about a subject of interest to me in the course of translating the source text and sometimes even get the chance to write entries or essays. Over the past few years I have translated a lot on art glass, starting with “The Coburg Prize for Contemporary Glass 2014” for the Veste Coburg. This project led to the collaboration with a private collection in Hamburg, the Barbara Achilles Stiftung. The first volume of their collection catalogue was published in 2016 and we are now preparing the second volume. This is the first time I have translated the entire text for a two-volume publication from German into English. I guess that fact, in addition to my fascination with the subject, makes it probably the most challenging and rewarding project I have worked on so far.

Q. What is the most fulfilling aspect of your career as a language professional?
I find it especially fulfilling that I get to do on a daily basis that which I enjoy doing: working with languages. Since I spend most of the year in Philadelphia, translating keeps me connected with my native German, and also helps me feel close to home when I am away. Translating is work that forces you to evolve and grow every day. You have to stay up-to-date with the languages (English, German, and Italian in my case), the technology, and also with the scientific developments in the field(s) of expertise. I find the more I translate, the more this happens practically automatically.

I also appreciate the flexibility that comes with working as a freelance translator. You can plan your overall schedule and each individual day yourself, and you can work from wherever you are. It doesn’t matter if I am in my office in Philadelphia, or at my other home in Munich. This gives me the feeling of freedom that I need to thrive.

Q. How has being a member of helped you meet your freelance objectives?
Becoming a translator was a career change for me, even if it was a smooth transition where one step led to another. From the beginning, was the most important resource for finding clients. When I started as a translator, I translated a broader range of topics, such as financial, legal and medical documents. Based in the US, I was often translating into German under tight deadlines, sending the documents at 3 am so that my clients in Europe would have the translation at the beginning of their business day. As I built my reputation, I was able to focus more and more on my field of expertise and get away from the overnight jobs. Now I translate almost exclusively for art galleries, museums, editors, university professors and tourism agencies. Many of the clients I work with on a regular basis found me on, ranging from a philosophy professor in Florida who writes on Hegel to an art gallery in Switzerland. In fact, several of my clients I have not met in person – is our meeting place. My membership continues to pay dividends by giving me access to interesting clients all over the world.

Q. The theme of this campaign is ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?
I am very happy as things are right now. I have a five-year old son, and when he was little it was difficult to find a work-life balance. Now that he goes to kindergarten and becomes more and more independent, I am able to take on larger projects and still feel confident that I can deliver high quality in relatively short time frames. If anything, my plan for the future is to tackle more of these large projects.