Podcast: interview with Eric Candle on medical interpreting 2

Here’s a new ProZ.com podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

As you may already know, next Thursday (July 21st) the first ProZ.com Interpreter Virtual Workshop will be held so I talked to Eric Candle, who is a Member of the Board of the International Medical Interpreters Association and who will be one of the speakers at a session called “Leaving the semi-professional status behind” – advancing the professionalization of medical interpreting field and National Certification for Medical Interpreters — What Every Interpreter Needs to Know to Become Certified”. In this interview Eric describes his role as  a member of the Board of the International Medical Interpreters Association and explains the association’s mission.  He also describes some of the topics that will be covered during his presentation. Eric also provides some insight about the current trends in the medical interpreting field and mentions the different ways in which this service can be provided (telephone interpreting, video remote interpreting, on site interpreting, etc.) Eric highlights the importance of the professionalization of medical interpreting and refers to the major difference between being a bilingual person and being a professional medical interpreter. When asked what advice he would give to an interpreter willing to work in the medical field, he does not hesitate to assert that the two sound steps to take in this direction are: to get trained and, for U.S. residents, to join the IMIA.

You can listen to the interview here ProZ.com podcast, 2011-07-15

I hope you enjoy this interview. If you are an interpreter do not forget to register for the first ProZ.com’s Interpreter Virtual Workshop to be held on July 21st (that is next Thursday!)

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Later!

Romina

10 strategies to expand your translation business: Part 9 Reply

This is the ninth post in a ten-part series that provides information on ten different strategies for staying competitive and growing your translation business.

Ninth strategy: Attending translation industry events

Attending industry events also provides the opportunity to network with other professionals, learn more on different translation-related topics, and new trends and technologies, discuss theories with colleagues, present work and expand your business.

How can I network by attending translation industry events with ProZ.com?

ProZ.com hosts virtual and in-person conferences, training courses, powwows and more. Virtual events in particular can be convenient if you are short of time to travel.

At ProZ.com events, language professionals can meet other professionals, either virtually or in person, share experiences and knowledge, and have fun with fellow translators and interpreters while having the chance to receive job offers.

Learn more about upcoming ProZ.com events here.

Do you usually attend translation industry events? What benefits have you found in attending events? What do you like most, virtual or in-person events?

Stay tuned for the next, and last, post in this series on Writing a business plan.

Time to listen to the 4th ProZ.com podcast! Reply

Hi all!

I’m happy to share with you the fourth ProZ.com podcast (four already? wow!). ProZ.com podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement). In this week’s podcast you will find:

You can see the photos of the London powwows here.

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Have fun!

Romina

Background music: Tea Roots by Kevin MacLeod

Third ProZ.com podcast now available Reply

Hi there!

I’m happy to share with you the third ProZ.com podcast. ProZ.com podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement) . In this week’s podcast you will find:

ProZ.com podcast, 2011-05-13

The photos of this interview have been posted on the ProZ.com page on Facebook

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Have fun!

Romina

Background music:  Tafi Maradi by Kevin MacLeod

The Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 competition is on 1

Hi all!

I’ve just received the great news that ProZ.com’s page on Facebook has been nominated for the category ”Language Facebook Pages” at the Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 competition.

You can see the announcement here.

The nomination period goes from May 3rd to May 16th. You can visit this page to make your nominations.

Romina

Some highlights in translation for March 1

I hope everyone had a good March. Here are some highlights and stories of interest in the translation industry for this past month as it comes to a close:

  • Efforts to provide assistance to those affected by the disaster in Japan:
    1. The Japan Association of Translators (JAT) assembled a list of volunteer interpreters to help in the aftermath of the disaster.
    2. The Japanese Association of Medical Interpreters (JAMI) set up a call center to help out in the disaster.
    3. The International Medical Interpreter Association (IMIA) has built a Disaster Relief Database. This international effort lists interpreters in many different language combinations and sends the information periodically to 20 non-profits around the world, including the Japanese Red Cross.
    4. Translators without Borders announced that it is ready to assist with requests for translation related to the disaster from humanitarian non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

Read more >>

  • Job flow on the site, which has been trending upward, hit an all-time high during March.
  • Translators Without Borders and the ProZian community are working together in large humanitarian localization project.  Read more >>
  • The European Patent Office and Google followed up on their announcement of intent to collaborate by signing a long-term agreement to collaborate on machine translation of patents.  Read more >>
  • Euan Fry, who helped bring world-class translations of the Bible to the indigenous peoples of Australia and Papua New Guinea passed away on March 1st.  Read more >>
  • Translation industry ‘founding father’ Geoffrey Kingscott passed away on March 2nd.   Read more >>
  • The results of GALA’s quarterly economic survey were published for the first quarter of 2011. GALA also announced the launch of a full-time, funded initiative to define localization standards. The GALA 2011 conference wrapped up yesterday in Lisbon.
  • The TAUS Data Association (TDA) opened the free “Corpora-for-MT” service to the public, and TAUS/CNGL machine translation post-editing guidelines were published.
  • Check out an interesting post by Kirti Vashee of eMpTy Pages on “The future of Translation Memory (TM)”.
  • The Prosperous Translator: Advice from Fire Ant & Worker Bee is now available through the ProZ.com Books section, along with a selection of other works by ProZ.com members which are of interest to translators.

Thanks also to Véronica Coquard of Vers d’autres horizons… for this month’s guest blog post, “Don’t lower your rates! There are better ways of getting noticed”.

See the ProZ.com newsletter for March for more news.

Stay on top of what is happening in the industry by following Translation industry news.

Have a great month of April!

Jared

Some highlights in translation for February Reply

It’s time again for the monthly ProZ.com newsletter, on its way to your inbox, and a brief look at some of the translation news and information of interest in February:

What was the biggest translation news story or most interesting piece of information in translation in February for you?