Confessions of a Freelance Translator: An interview with Gary Smith Reply

“Welcome to one of the best jobs in the world!” screams the back cover of Gary Smith’s new book: Confessions of a Freelance Translator, Secrets To Success, a book offering practical, easily applicable tips to make a successful living out of freelance translation.

Gary Smith, a ProZ.com member, Certified PRO, trainer, event organizer and conference speaker, is an experienced proofreader and translator from Spanish and Catalan to English. A British native, he has lived in Spain for over two decades, offering webinars and talks internationally and around Spain.

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Gary Smith, author of “Confessions of a Freelance Translator, Secrets To Success”

In today’s post, I had a chance to speak with Gary about Confessions of a Freelance TranslatorSecrets To Success, the motivation behind the book, the process of writing it and the usefulness of the tips and tricks he provides throughout the book to translators starting out or who wish to make the leap to better earnings and work.


The interview

Me: What inspired you to write this book?

Gary: This is the kind of book I wish I’d had many years ago, so I could have avoided mistakes! Back then I would have loved this book with plenty of practical, applicable tips on freelance translation to start out or move up to higher earnings and productivity.

I think today in general there’s a generally positive attitude in the freelance translation community and a good example of that is Erik Hansson’s cathartic Facebook page “Things Translators Never Say” (TTNS) (voted winner of the ProZ.com Community Choice Award for best Facebook Page), which looks at frustrating situations with clients with humor and inspired this book’s title (there is a section in the book with funny situations with clients). It’s far better to laugh about such things with our colleagues around the world than to bang your head against the desk!

Even so, I felt there was a need for a book with this positive attitude that also gives a great deal of realistic, useful advice for translators about how to improve their situation. The Things Translators Never Say group gave me plenty of examples of typical problems faced by freelance translators, which helped me understand what they need and produce a book for them, all with a dash of of humour. And here it is!

Me:  What was the hardest part of writing this book?

Gary: Strangely, the same kind of things we come across as translators, since translators themselves are writers! In other words: organisation, editing, revising, reviewing, proofreading, layout, design, etc. Then, as our translation clients sometimes do, I’d discover something new or realize I’d forgotten to mention something, so I’d have to add it in a logical, coherent way. Sometimes I thought I’d never finish it!

It’s taken about three years to write and I’ve used material from my own talks as well as studying successful small businesses and listening to advice from my experienced translation colleagues, of course.

Me: How much of the book is realistic? Are experiences based on someone you know, or events in your own professional life?

Gary: All of it! But the difference with this book is that there are lots of examples we can all relate to from service providers we come across in everyday life, using similar “tricks of the trade” that are in fact relevant to all professions and applying them to translation services to help attract and keep good clients.

There are also many examples from my own experience in the profession and from translators I have known over the years. Too many good translators are let down by a lack of simple, practical business nous that doesn’t seem to get taught enough in formal education. Whether we like it or not, most translators have to be freelancers and therefore entrepreneurs to a certain extent to make a good living.

Me: Is there a message in your book that you want readers to grasp?

Gary: Hmm…I’d say above all the message is that you can definitely make a good living out of translation by being a good professional and that the pros definitely outweigh the cons. It’s a great job if you get it right!

Me: Did you learn anything from writing your book? If so, what was it?

Gary: Well, as I’ve found when preparing my talks for congresses and webinars, when you want to teach something well and clearly you always end up fact-checking and learning something yourself, yes. I learned a lot from small business experts and even about sales psychology. And I also listened to some of my successful translation colleagues, of course! But with this book in particular, I observed service providers of all kinds, learning how they deal with their customers.

Me: Can we take a sneak peek at the book before its release?

29a0fa76-d14e-474b-86f9-6dec6a4fe8deThe book, through Gary: “…First, let’s put ourselves in our potential client’s shoes. The monolingual, monocultural client needs a text translated but knows nothing about translation, how to find a good translator, or how much they may reasonably charge. Their idea of a human translator may be a studious hermit sitting at a desk piled with paper dictionaries, holding a quill poised in the air as they muse over a mixed metaphor. On the other hand, the only translator everybody in the developed world has heard of is Google Translate. Everybody has used the famous word cruncher once in a while to see what their Chinese tattoo actually means or get the gist of a foreign news article or recipe. So our potential client knows of Google Translate at least. They also know it is capable of translating thousands of words per second for free. And then they turn to you and discover that it will take days and cost several hundreds or thousands of euros. Understandably, they may well be taken aback.

To understand their predicament, imagine your car breaks down in a town you don’t know and you have to find a decent mechanic to repair it. At one garage they nonchalantly tell you it’s going to cost € 5‌‌‍0 and take half an hour. At another, they shake their heads sagely and tell you it’ll cost € 1,000 and take a week. Who’s telling the truth? Who knows what they’re doing? Who’s trying to rip you off? In order to gain a potential client’s confidence, there are little strategies that mechanics and other service providers from lawyers to doctors can and do use to allay our fears and convince us to choose their services. We, too, can apply such strategies to gain our clients’ trust. We shall look at them throughout this book.”

Me: When will the book be released and how will readers be able to purchase it?

Gary:  The book will be made available any time now at Lulu.com.

The book

Confessions of a Freelance Translator is divided into easily digestible sections relating to: finding, keeping and dealing with clients, setting fees, visibility, guiding the client through the translation process, freelance organisation in general, specialisation with some useful tips on scientific and technical translation, a general discussion of hot topics (e.g. machine and crowd translation), some tips on small interpreting jobs and of course some hilarious examples of confessions of a freelance translator!


Get this book →

ProZ.com community book: share your knowledge and stand out as a published author Reply

topOSTProZ.com has launched the ProZ.com community book project, an initiative to help language professionals to spread useful information among potential clients and colleagues, while promoting themselves as experts in a given field or topic.

The ProZ.com community book will feature articles written by site  members on topics of interest to the translation community that may range from machine translation, cloud-based translation tools and new translation technologies, to rates, training and  work-life balance, among other topics.

The initiative does not only give language professionals the opportunity to promote themselves as seasoned professionals, but also to become  published authors and enjoy  the benefits  this offers, including:

  • Visibility: published authors become visible among peers and this creates an advantage for them, especially when time comes to attract the attention of clients.
  • Credibility: book authors and collaborators get instant credibility and authority in connection with the field or topic in which they publish. This in turn translates into becoming not only a source of information, but also a resource for anyone in need of  specialized information.
  • Permanence: books are born to stay regardless of the format in which they get published and a book that goes around  is also a book that keeps promoting  its  content and author(s) at no extra cost!
  • Opportunities: many times names associated with books result in invitations to speak at events or offer training, and eve n to participate in further publications.
  • Networking:  the discussion of a book is a good  way to break the ice!  Published authors may be invited to participate in discussions with their readers  via email,  in social networks and at  events.
  • Clients:  published authors know their field, a quality searched for by good clients. And because they are seen as  experts, clients will  rarely try to get discounts for their specialized  services.

All ProZ.com members are invited to submit an article to be reviewed for possible inclusion in the community book until February 29th, 2016, 23:59 GMT. If you are not a ProZ.com member, become one today and start enjoying  all the benefits the site has to offer, including the community book.


Are you a published author?  Share a link to your material below.

En 2016 Argentina sigue de powwow: ¿te sumás? Reply

En 2015, el equipo de ProZ.com en Argentina propuso la iniciativa ¡Argentina está de powwow! y convocó a todos los traductores e intérpretes argentinos —y afines— a invitar a otros colegas a visitar y conocer sus ciudades organizando un powwow presencial.

Los powwows de ProZ.com son reuniones informales de grupos de usuarios del sitio organizados por traductores locales y que representan una excelente oportunidad para entablar relaciones profesionales con otros colegas y socializar con ellos.

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Primer powwow de 2015 – Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires

Así fue como a lo largo de este año se organizaron encuentros en diferentes puntos del país –Entre Ríos, Corrientes, Buenos Aires, Santa Fe y Córdoba entre otros– para conocer a las personas detrás de los perfiles:

Powwows de ProZ.com de 2015

Además, el pasado 18 de diciembre, los profesionales argentinos también tuvieron la oportunidad de reunirse on-line en el primer powwow virtual argentino en el que conversaron sobre tarifas, métodos de cobro, certificaciones, estrategias de publicidad, hicieron amigos nuevos y pasaron un buen momento.

En 2016, la convocatoria continúa abierta para todos los usuarios de ProZ.com que tengan la identidad verificada en sus perfiles o que sean miembros pagos del sitio, y que residan en cualquier rincón de Argentina o el mundo. En otras palabras, todos están invitados a proponer y organizar un powwow. ¿El objetivo? Conocernos, intercambiar experiencias y pasarla bien.

Felicitaciones a Stef Buiatti, organizadora del powwow en Gualeguaychu, por resultar ganadora del día de spa sorteado entre todos los organizadores, y gracias a todos los demás organizadores por invitarnos a visitar sus ciudades: Leandro OderoMarina Menendez, Juan Manuel Macarlupu PeñaAdriana Iris y Julieta Olivero.

Powwow en Gualeguaychu: “Día de verano junto al río”

¡Nos vemos en el próximo powwow!


Más imágenes de powwows en Argentina »

Próximos powwows alrededor del mundo »

 

Desayunando con ProZ.com: café, estrategias y secretos de la profesión Reply

A mediados de agosto de 2015, el equipo de ProZ.com en Argentina propuso una iniciativa llamada DesayunoZ y abrió sus puertas por primera vez para recibir a estudiantes y traductores noveles en su cocina y compartir café con estrategias de marketing, secretos para establecer tarifas, facturar y cobrar, y alguna que otra sugerencia para evitar los riesgos típicos de la profesión, entre otras especialidades sobre la mesa.

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Cocina de ProZ.com  – La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Tras un exitoso desayuno-charla de casi cuatro horas –al que además se sumó una competencia de sapo– y la evidente necesitad de información clave para tener éxito como profesionales, se decidió que este desayuno sería el primero, ¡pero no el último!

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Competencia de sapo

Este es un breve resumen de los DesayunoZ que hemos compartido hasta el momento:

Gracias a todos los DesayunadoreZ que han pasado por la casa de ProZ.com en Argentina este 2015:

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Agosto

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Septiembre

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Octubre

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Noviembre

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Diciembre

Espero que en 2016 nos visiten aún más DesayunadoreZ en Argentina, en nuestras otras casas y en cualquier lugar del mundo donde haya café y deseos de aprender, conectarse con colegas y compartir un buen momento.

¡Hasta próximos DesayunoZ!

LL


Aprendé más sobre los DesayunoZ de ProZ.com →

¿Querés organizar DesayunoZ en tu ciudad? Enviá un correo electrónico a lucia@proz.com.

‘Giving Tuesday’ year-end donation drive: thank you all who donated! Reply

FBBoostFrom December 1st until December 3rd, ProZ.com, Dutch translator and copywriter Pieter Beens and the rest of the ProZ.com community joined forces in a ‘Giving Tuesday’ year-end donation drive and collected over $1,800 USD to be donated to Books For Africa, Concern Worldwide and SOS Children’s Villages. In turn, ProZ.com matched dollar for dollar the collected amount and over $3,600 USD will now benefit these three non-profit organizations.

Funds were collected through ProZ.com membership sales, training purchases, as well as from direct donations, and the translator community also shared their translated version of a very famous quote by Mother Teresa:

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Click here to see translated versions or suggest your own.

Special thanks go to…

  • Pieter Beens for proposing this initiative and spreading the word.
  • ProZ.com professional trainers Claudia BrauerAnneta VysotskayaKonstantin Kisin and Samuel Sebastian Holden Bramah for donating their time and knowledge.
  • ProZ.com users and members who donated through membership and training, or by making a direct donation.
  • ProZ.com users and members who proposed their translation of Mother Teresa’s quote.
  • Everyone who helped to spread the word!

Thank you all who joined ProZ.com’s 2015 celebration of Giving Tuesday!


How did you celebrate Giving Tuesday? Share below.

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Giving Tuesday is here!

After an entire year networking, expanding your business, improving your work and having fun, you now have the opportunity to give something back: whether it be through donations, fundraising, volunteering your time and expertise, or simply by calling others to support a particular cause or initiative.

At the end of October this year, one ProZ.com staff member was approached by Pieter Beens, a Dutch translator and copywriter, as well as a ProZ.com member since 2011, with the idea of a charity campaign to be promoted among ProZ.com community members. The result? A ‘Giving Tuesday’ year-end donation drive that starts today, Tuesday, December 1st, and will run until Thursday, December 3rd:

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Help spread the word on social media using the hashtags #GivingTuesday and #ProZcomDrive.

Join this #GivingTuesday movement and support the following non-profit organizations:

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Books For Africa collects, sorts, ships, and distributes books to students of all ages in Africa. They remain the largest shipper of donated text and library books to the African continent, shipping over 34 million books to 49 different countries since 1988.

concern worldwide

Concern Worldwide implements emergency response programs primarily in the world’s poorest countries, has been a leader in health and nutrition issues, and has been on the forefront of helping communities develop resilience to high-impact climate extremes.

SOS-Childrens-Villages-International-NEGATIVE-EnglishSOS Children’s Villages works to prevent family breakdown and care for children who have lost parental care, or who risk losing it. They work with communities, partners and states to ensure that the rights of all children, in every society, are respected and fulfilled.


ProZ.com will match, dollar for dollar, the first $10,000 USD donated to these charities.


Make an impact. Join this drive →

Special thanks go to Pieter Beens for the initiative, to ProZ.com professional trainers Claudia BrauerKonstantin KisinSamuel Sebastian Holden Bramah and Anneta Vysotskaya for donating their time and knowledge in support of this drive, and to the members of the translation community who join ProZ.com and Pieter Beens in this #ProZcomDrive!


Do you have any other plans for #GivingTuesday? Share below.

Meet the speaker: Oleg Rudavin and the selling of knowledge and skills Reply

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Russian and Ukrainian translator, ProZ.com conference organizer and trainer

Oleg Rudavin is a Russian and Ukrainian translator –and a garden flowers lover— who has been part of the translation industry since 1985 and an active ProZ.com player since 2001. At ProZ.com, Oleg has acted as a moderator and he is currently a trainer, the site’s local contact in Ukraine and a dear friend.

With extensive experience in freelancing as a method of conducting business, he is also the author of Internet Freelancing: Practical Guide for Translators, a book published in both English and Russian.

Oleg is also one of the organizers of the 2015 regional conference in Kharkiv, Ukraine –his fourth conference!– and the speaker in charge of the last session of the day: “Монетизация знаний, умений и навыков, или что продавать”, and his 12th presentation at a ProZ.com event.

The interview

How did you get started in translation and what was the most important obstacle for you to overcome in building your career as a language professional?

I graduated from the foreign languages department of Kharkiv University in 1985 and have been translating and interpreting since then. The most important obstacle to overcome at that time was mental stereotypes: the new opportunities that appeared with the Internet were way beyond anything I had known before.

Do you maintain relationships with your fellow professionals? If so, in what ways?

I do – in all possible ways, both in person (regularly meeting locally, or occasionally at conferences) and online, with direct communication or in social networks.

How do you see the future of translation for freelancers?

Pessimistic on the whole. The growth of the demand is mostly due to the low quality/price segment expanding; the existing supply can’t match the demand; as a result, the quality criteria and standards get worse.

Is this your first time as a ProZ.com event speaker? If so, what are your expectations and what can event attendees expect to learn or know from your presentation?

I first spoke at a ProZ.com conference about ten years ago and do it quite a lot. It’s probably because I love sharing my knowledge and experience – and know for sure that a lot of my colleagues benefit from it.

My presentation is aimed at showing attending how to apply self-criticism and how to acquire the ability (or at least the desire) to analyse and plan ahead. A conference is usually a great way to get answers to most of one’s questions – often from informal communications rather than from presentations.

The conference

Follow Oleg and the rest of speakers and attendees live this Saturday, November 21st, through Twitter and Livestream.

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Visit event page »            View event program »            View related social events »


How do you sell your knowledge and skills?

Post below or discuss in ProZ.com forums →