A silver bullet against translation scammers 1

Scammers who prey on translators will not go away. They operate under fake names, pretending to be clients, and cheat translators out of their work or money. The community has taken on the task of creating resources and sharing information about these scams with impressive results, creating an abundance of posts raising awareness about scams targeting translators. The oldest such article I could find dates back to January 2011, and since then they have multiplied. There are also discussion hubs like ProZ.com’s Scams forum in which information about scammers is shared on a daily basis. I think it is More…

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Scams targeting translators: the advance payment scam, and how to get the word out? 5

Earlier this year a few blog posts were made here regarding scams targeting translators; I’ll post links to them at the bottom of this post for easy reference. It is interesting to note that these are the T.O. posts with the most views so far, and that among the search terms used by visitors coming to this blog, those which are clearly translators seeking information on possible scams rank highest, daily. I don’t know if scams targeting translators are on the rise, but they definitely do not seem to have diminished much. In the ProZ.com More…

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Please share: translator who alerted colleagues about TransQuotation is target of false “scam alert” 10

TransQuotation is a website that acts as a translation job portal, with the option of paid membership to receive access to jobs. As far back as 2006, members of ProZ.com and of other legitimate translators’ portals have reported the unauthorized “lifting” and re-posting of jobs from their sites on TransQuotation, indicating that paid membership there is for access to work which has specifically been offered elsewhere. This re-posting of work without the knowledge or consent of the outsourcer can lead to confusion and hassle for both outsourcer and translator. ProZ.com site staff have taken measures More…

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Translators be aware: an ongoing scam asks for help using real translators as the “senders” 23

Early this week an ongoing scam using the impersonation of real translators and the emulation of their emails as a point of contact was reported. This scam appears to take the form of an email “sent” from the real translator to other translators, using the real translator’s name and possibly data to lend credit to the sender, such as links to the translator’s website, etc. The emails appear to the recipient to have been sent from the real translator, with the actual sender’s address (the scammer’s address) “masked” behind this in order to receive any More…

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Translator scams and how to protect yourself from them 26

Freelance translators should think of themselves as business people. As such, they should pay serious attention to risk management, including the actions needed to minimize the risk of being the victims of a scam. Scams are everywhere and they are extremely varied. It is said that one in ten adults have fallen for a scam. Some of the victims are  poor and desperate, but others are educated and clever, and  believed themselves to be immune to this kind of plot. Reports from ProZ.com members seem to indicate an increase in translation or translator-specific scams. There More…

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An approach to risk management in the language industry (part 5 of 5) Reply

This last part of an article first published in the June 2016 issue of the MultiLingual magazine, presents some practical examples of the application of risk management policies in the language industry.  Some practical examples A few concrete cases are included here as example of risks to be found, as well as their possible remedies. Non-linguistic examples have been selected, as experience shows that people in the language industry tend to overemphasize the linguistic aspects of life. Area: Commercial / marketing Risk: A new client request comes from a scammer Remedy: Scams are a typical More…

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An approach to risk management in the language industry (part 4 of 5) Reply

This fourth part of an article first published in the June 2016 issue of the MultiLingual magazine, deals with the application of the previous considerations to the language industry.  Risk management in the language industry Both the PMI and the ISO 31000 provide generic, high level frameworks that should be adapted to the realities of each organization. This is usually done by project managers and, in some organizations, by a Project Management Office (PMO). Several factors conspire against the organization-level implementation in the language industry, starting with the small average size of the actors (many More…

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