Improved messaging and invitations in the translation center powered by ProZ.com Reply

New features and tools have been added to the translation center powered by ProZ.com and made available to ProZ.com Business members

Improved messaging

  • Messages can now be posted from a work order or a job, addressed to all players or to administrators or even to individual translators. You can also filter the messages exchanged based on their visibility.
  • It is also possible to reply to messages directly from the “last messages” tab in the dashboard, including the messages posted by translators from the page where jobs are offered to them.

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Improvements to invitations

  • Several improvements were introduced to the pages used for inviting and assigning translators to accept a posted job, including a more intuitive navigation among them.
  • When a team or a set of providers are picked for the queue of a job, all other eligible providers can now be added to the queue, in case the originally selected translators did not accept the invitations.
  • You can have invitations sent manually to this team, selecting how many invitations should be sent at time and the minutes between batches of invitations. Translators can also be manually invited from the pool.
  • You can modify the order of translators in that pool by clicking and dragging their names up or down, send messages to translators, manually add or remove translators to the list of candidates for invitation and even deactivate an invitation already sent.
  • Invited translators will access a page where they will have access to the available information and will be able to exchange messages with the job posters.
  • Depending on the configuration selected when the job was created, invited translators will be able to directly accept a task, or the assignment will be manually done by the job posters (generally based on the messages received from the invited translators).

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Clients and teams

  • Teams are a powerful feature in the translation center, that lets you group your service providers in accordance to whatever criteria you select, in such a way that any service provider can be in none, one or many teams. Whatever is needed for your operation.
  • It is now possible to associate a client with a given team, either as a preset value or as a forced option, so that when a PM (or even a contact from the client) creates a work order, the translators contacted will belong to the team pre-selected for the client in particular.

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Other improvements

  • It is now possible to upload files of up to 25 MB, up from a previous 10 MB limit.
  • Instructions can now be posted in projects, work orders and jobs, and they will be also presented to translators in the page where the assignments are offered to them.
  • Providers are now presented in a tabular format, alphabetically sorted, with page sizes of 15, 50 or 100 translators per page. A link to the translators’ ProZ.com profile is provided.

The translation center powered by ProZ.com is used by Translators without Borders and several commercial translation companies to deliver millions of translated words every month. This platform is made available to all ProZ.com Business members. If you want to learn more about this platform, please submit a support request and I will contact you.

Open road interview series: Eszter Lelik. Interpreter, translator, winner of a new car Reply

Eszter Lelik

Eszter Lelik is the subject of this latest installment in the Open road interview series. Eszter is an English to Hungarian interpreter and translator from Hungary, and was also the grand prize winner of a new Nissan Juke. Her win was announced on 10 January, 2017 in a live broadcast from ProZ.com headquarters in Syracuse. Congratulations, Eszter! On to the interview:


Q. First, the most important question: Where’s the first place you will go in your new car?

Well, I wish I could go on a longer trip with the new car but this is a very busy season for me as interpreter and translator so I can think in terms of a short ride only. So I decided to go to Lake Balaton and visit some friends there.

Q. Now, from your website I see that you have over twenty years of experience as a translator and interpreter. What kind of changes have you noticed in your work and in the industry during the course of your career?

In the course of the past 23 years as it is quite understandable many things have changed. When I started my career, a few years after the political transition here in Hungary, very few people could speak and did speak foreign languages. There was a high demand for interpreters and also for translators in my case, as I worked at that time at one of the Big 6 companies mainly due to the privatization processes where all the documents had to be translated into English. Now, more than 20 years later a new generation grew up, these young people, or rather their parents, realized the importance of foreign language skills so the majority of them speak English, but quite often a second foreign language as well. The multinational companies use English as their corporate language (even if it is e.g., a German company), thus the need for translation has greatly decreased. Nevertheless, considering my specific areas of expertise and the fact that I am doing mainly simultaneous interpreting, plus working not only in English but also in German, I am optimistic about my personal perspectives.

Q. You’ve interpreted for some impressive brands and organizations. What do you find most rewarding about your work as an interpreter?

To become an interpreter has always been my dream. Now, more than two decades after the start of my career I am still certain that I have the best job in the world, at least the right one for me. I like independence, intellectual activity, constant learning, and travelling, always meeting new and interesting people. I have worked for/with famous politicians, celebrities, artists and I sometimes I am amused by realizing that most of them have already disappeared from the public life, from the stage, and I am still here.

Q. Are you optimistic about the future of the language industry?

In my previous answer I have mentioned already what I think of my own future, the future of my career. To be quite honest I am not optimistic at all concerning the future of the language industry in general. With all the translation memories, interpreting gadgets and the obsession with saving money on everything to the detriment of the quality, I think in about 10 years’ time lots of translators and interpreters will be left without any assignment, or paid much less than today.

Q. The theme of this campaign was ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?

Open Road for me means new challenges, opportunities and many new things to explore.  I think in our profession constant learning has to be the first priority. Thus, for me, deepening my knowledge in some specific areas, like medical and legal areas, is very important. Learning the use of CAT tools would be also necessary and also modernizing  my website is there on my agenda.

Eszter Lelik 2

 

Thanks Eszter for your time, and congratulations once again.

All interviews in the Open road series can be seen at http://www.proz.com/open-road.

5 Translation Conferences you might attend in 2017 1

Pieter_Beens
Pieter Beens is a freelance translator and copywriter working in English to Dutch, and a frequent guest contributor to the Translator T.O. 

In this post, Pieter takes a look a few upcoming events for translators in 2017.


January has already come to an end. It’s February now and the conference season is about to start. In this article I present to you 5 translation conferences you might attend in 2017. They’re presented in order of date, so this overview can still be helpful if the first few are already past.

The benefits of attending a translation conference

Translating generally is a silent job. Many of us do not regularly meet clients or colleagues in daily life. At the same time it can be difficult to cope with all the changes in the industry or simply have a fresh view on what you’re doing or using day after day. Visiting a translation conference can be a good idea then. They offer you opportunities to meet like-minded colleagues from all over the world. As the conference often takes two or more days, there are a number of sessions, combined with some great relaxing opportunities. So there’s always something to take home for every participant: if you don’t like one presentation, it is compensated for by another.

And then there is the networking part of conferences. During conferences you’re drawn into discussions with forum members, fellow participants and providers of industry-leading software or tools (who in many cases sponsor the organization of the conferences). So don’t forget to take your business cards and networking apps, and exchange your details.

Translation conferences to attend in 2017
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EliaTogether, February 23-24, Berlin

EliaTogether is one of the biggest industry events in the European Union. Together is hosted by Elia, the European Language Industry Organization. It is held in a different city in Europe each year. This year it will take place in Berlin on February 23 and 24. The programme contains sessions for translators and interpreters, as well as for freelancers and agencies. Last year more than 300 participants were present, so it will be a huge event.

Registration is still possible. Rates are available at http://2017.elia-together.org/rates/

 

Translation and Localization Conference, March 24-25, Warsaw

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The Translation and Localization Conference in Warsaw is unique. It hosts 350+ guests from all over the world (last year there were 30+ nationalities). The programme is both aimed at translators and interpreters. The TLC is held in Novotel Hotel in Warsaw, a great place to stay with a multitude of options to relax and enjoy great presentations. The location is good as are the facilities.

The TLC is organized by a couple of volunteers from the translation industry. They succeed each year in setting up a great event with several interesting tracks. Visit www.translation-conference.com/ for more information.

 

BP17, May 4-6, Budapest

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The Business and Practice Conference in Budapest is a yearly event that is aimed at freelance translators. It is organized by a translator and hosts a schedule full of masterclasses and business related presentations. All professionals that have a say at the conference are people with real hands-on experience as a translator. They therefore share their own knowledge and experiences, which makes this conference great for starters who want to learn more as well as for seasoned translators that want to network and share knowledge. The BP conference is also a kind of promotion for Hungary as the organization offers plenty time to learn to know the capital of Hungary.

Check out the full schedule at http://bpconf.com/

 

FIT Congress, August 3-5, Brisbane

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The International Federation of Translators hosts a conference every two years. The flagship conference will happen this year again. It welcomes translators, interpreters and other industry professionals to have their say about disruption and diversification.

The call for papers is still open, so you can try to secure your spot for hosting your own presentation at http://www.fit-ift.org/brisbane-2017/

 

ATA58, October 25-28, Washington D.C

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ATA58 is the 58th conference of the American Translator Association. It will be held in Washington D.C. this year. Each year the organization chooses a different location, but all conferences have in common that they are beyond spectacular. It is a typical American conference in that it is big and bold. There is room enough for networking possibilities, while there are also opportunities to meditate, fitness and relax.

During the conference there are options to pass the ATA examination, and the presentations are full of information for translators and interpreters alike.


ProZ.com
 Conference?

If there is a chance, ProZ.com tries to host its own conference each year. In the past the company held conferences in Rotterdam, Stockholm and other interesting cities. The ProZ.com conference is organized by volunteers from the massive translators and interpreters community with support of ProZ.com. This year’s conference is still unknown, but if there will be one it would certainly worth to visit with it’s great sight-seeing and networking opportunities and hands-on knowledge sharing.

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Other translation conferences in 2017

Of course there are many more translation conferences to be held in 2017. They are spread over the whole world and have varying knowledge levels, networking and relaxing opportunities and price tags. Visit an overview of translation conferences in 2017 at https://www.vertaalt.nu/blog/translation-conferences-2017/


Guest post: 10 things translators need to know about machine translation 2

Meet Gwenydd Jonesa freelance Spanish to English translator and professional trainer. She has two MAs, the first in Translation Studies and the second in Legal Translation, and the DipTrans (CIOL). With 10 years’ experience, Gwenydd specializes in business, marketing and legal translation. She is also a copywriter.

Learn more about Gwenydd and some of the courses she offers by checking out her blog, translatorstudio.co.uk.


I don’t know about you, but I spend much of my life going from one translation project to the next. I want to learn about translation technology, but am always putting it off. Not my idea of fun. For me, m1074712_r55e018418b6a3achine translation is like the hologrammatic elephant in my home office.

Last June, I had to prepare a talk for the ProZ.com conference in Stockholm. Finally, an opportunity to confront the elephant. I set out to find answers to my questions, hoping to put my worries to rest. I wanted to find out: what is going on with machine translation? Is it a real threat to human translators? And if it is, what should we be doing about it?

In my webinar Your Essential Machine Translation Briefing, on 8 Feb, I’ll share what I found out. From the perspective of a technically challenged freelancer. In the first half, I’ll give you a summary of what is currently going on in machine translation. Then, I’ll share the strategies I’m employing in my work, to make sure I develop alongside automated translation. See you there!

In the meantime, here are a few things freelance translators need to know about machine translation.

  1. ‘Machine translation’ isn’t the same as ‘translation memory’ or ‘CAT tool’

Sometimes translators get these terms muddled up, which is understandable. A computer-assisted translation (CAT) tool is an application where you can write your translations. It uses translation memories (TMs) to keep a record of all your past work. Don’t confuse that with a machine translation (MT) engine. An MT engine is an application that automatically translates a text. You can integrate MT with your CAT tool, but they are two different pieces of software. They have different functions.

  1. Machine translation is more effective with certain text types

Since computers rely on data and rules, the more predictable a text, the better the output will likely be. Formulaic and simple texts work well. Creative and complex texts don’t. Life sciences, finance, IT and other technical genres lend themselves to machine translation. But while financial accounts are formulaic, an accountant’s blog is far less predictable. With the second, you may well be faster on your own, particularly if you use voice recognition.

  1. Machine translation engines get better results when they’re customised

Translators and companies that are serious about machine translation aren’t using Google Translate. They get their own machine translation engines and train them for a specific domain. They do this by inputting their translation memories. After that, they input more data on an ongoing basis, so the machine keeps adapting to them. This is how they get more accurate output. Then they post edit it and feed the final translation back into the machine. With a suitable text type, this helps them finish the translation faster than if they did it from scratch.

  1. Neural machine translation is a major change in the translation industry

The world of machine translation is starting to harness deep learning. This is based on neural networks. Neural networks have lots of uses in artificial intelligence. Language processing is one of them. So, computer scientists can use them to improve machine translation. Companies that are using neural machine translation include: Google, Microsoft and Facebook.

  1. Google Translate is now using neural machine translation in some language combinations

Google recently announced that it is using neural machine translation in Google Translate. For now, it is limited to certain language combinations. They rolled it out with a total of eight language pairs. All are to and from English, combined with French, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Turkish. It’s free, but remember the data is public, so you can’t use it if you’ve signed a confidentiality agreement. Google Translate isn’t customised (see point 3), but it has lots of data. The jury is still out on how good the updated tool is.

  1. You can subscribe to your own machine translation engine and train it

You may not realise that companies that develop machine translation engines sell subscriptions. You can even pay to train your own engine using your translation memories. Post-editing isn’t just about an agency sending you texts. You can learn how to post edit, get a customised engine and then do whatever you want with it. The profits and control will be all yours.

  1. Companies that sell machine translation are battling for your business

If you want to try machine translation, you have to go shopping for a provider. The different companies that offer machine translation solutions (including SDL, Lilt and Systran) publish data to show how effective their software is. It’s all quite technical and confusing. And it can be biased. You can go to TAUS and the eMpTy Pages blog, for unbiased information.

Perhaps, like me, you prefer to see for yourself. One way of doing this is to observe yourself for a month in your work, and see how many words you average per hour. Then, pick whichever machine translation software takes your fancy and use it for a month. Track your turnover to see whether your hourly average gets faster or not. Then you’ll have your own data to tell you whether it’s worth continuing to invest.

  1. Machine translation isn’t currently replacing human translators

Improvements in machine translation don’t mean we’re all out of a job. But, it may mean our jobs will start to change. Commercial translation is often about getting an acceptable translation as quickly as possible. You can complete some texts faster by using customised machine translation and post-editing. And sometimes that is what the customer wants. As machine translation continues to get better, we can expect demand for post-editing to grow.

  1. Machine translation pricing isn’t set in stone, yet

While machine translation has a long history, it’s still being consolidated in our industry. Lots of translators and translation agencies are struggling to get their heads around it. Some translators are concerned that post-editing means lower pay. Certainly, ruthless agencies will try to use it as another way of driving prices down.

But, that doesn’t mean smart translators can’t use it to increase their profitability. Why shouldn’t we earn more on the days we work as post editors? If we learn about it, and talk about it, we’ll soon know how we want to price it. We’ll know when to refuse a job. Translators can choose to accept post-editing jobs only when they’re going to make more money for their time.

  1. Freelance translators have options regarding machine translation

We don’t all have to go running for the hills before the robots attack. Becoming a post editor is just one option open to us. If you like the idea of it, you could post edit for agencies. But, you could also subscribe to your own engine and use it in your work. If you don’t want to post edit, there are a host of specialisation and diversification options.

Whatever path you end up choosing, now is a good time to get informed and come up with a plan. If major changes do take place in our industry, I for one will be ready for them. Ready to adapt. To continue being the one who controls my career. To protect my rates, serve the direct customer competitively, and understand the jobs (and prices) agencies offer me.

I encourage you to join me at my webinar on 8 Feb, Your Essential Machine Translation Briefing. I’ll share everything I’ve found out about machine translation, in simple, unbiased terms. I’ll also tell you the strategies I’ve come up with, and am now employing in my work. Sign up here!

Open road interview series: Carl Brunet Reply

This is the final interview featuring ProZ.com members who have won Apple Watches as part of the site’s year-end membership campaign.

Congratulations to all of the winners!

Carl Brunet is the subject of today’s interview. Carl is a translator working in English and French, specializing in international relations, trade, marketing, environment, and finance, among other fields. He currently resides in Ottawa, Canada.


Q. Are you optimistic about the future of the language industry?
I’m optimistic in that people will always increasingly want to communicate and so there is a role for language professionals, but sometimes technology is imposed upon us and does not make the job necessarily easier.

Q. What’s the most rewarding part of your career as a freelance translator?
Having the freedom to call the shots, work as much as I want, where and when I want to. I’m currently on holiday in France.

Q. How has being a member of ProZ.com helped you meet your freelance objectives?
I have found some interesting jobs on the platform, gained valuable experience with some of the largest companies in the world and it is motivating to see so much work available if I want it.

Q. The theme of this campaign is ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?
I want to keep going down the path I’ve chosen, building my business and work on marketing myself better now that I’ve gained greater experience working for a huge variety of public and private sector clients.

Open road interview series: Frederique Griffith Reply

Today’s interview features Apple Watch winner Frederique Griffith. Frederique is a certified medical interpreter working in French to English and vice versa. She currently resides in Saint Louis, Missouri.

This is one of the final interviews conducted as part of ProZ.com’s year-end membership campaign. All prize winners have been selected, and you can find the full list of winners here. A special congratulations to our grand prize winner, Eszter Lelik, who won a brand new Nissan Juke!

See all previous posts in this series »


Frederique Griffith working from her home in Saint Louis.

Frederique Griffith working from her home in Saint Louis, Missouri

Q. Your profile indicates that you’re a medical interpreter. What do you find more rewarding – translating or interpreting?
I have been interpreting for several years now and really enjoy it. People are very grateful for the service provided. Whether they are filling out a form, seeing a doctor or interviewing for immigration, it is always reassuring to foreigners to have someone next to them who understands them. It is a pleasure to help people communicate that way. Translation is different as I don’t interact with people directly.

Q. Are you optimistic about the future of the language industry?
I am optimistic because people are traveling, moving and doing business across borders more and more easily and will always need quality work done in translation. Machine translation is far from being the equal of human work. Quality is important and cannot be attained cutting corners and using machines.

Q. How has being a member of ProZ.com helped you meet your freelance objectives?
I have learned quite a bit from ProZ.com. I have listened to several webinars, purchased a software at the group price, consulted the Blue Board to check on possible jobs and used the terminology glossary site quite a bit. Seeing and reading my colleagues’s viewpoints in the discussion forums is also very helpful.

Q. The theme of this campaign is ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?
I hope to do a little more translating as I transition from interpreting, where I spend a lot of time driving to and from appointments. Over the Phone and Video Interpreting also allow me to cut back on travel time. I enjoy the challenge that represents the translation of a document. I plan on increasing my knowledge of CAT tools and taking advantage of the online library available to ProZ.com members.

Open road interview series: Gudrun Dauner Reply

Gudrun Dauner is a freelance translator based in both Philadelphia and Munich. A native German speaker, she translates primarily from English and Italian into German and specializes in the field of art history.

Gudrun is the twelfth Apple Watch winner in ProZ.com’s year-end campaign giveaway. See all interviews in this series here.

Gudrun at her home office in Munich

Gudrun at her home office in Munich


Q. How did you initially start working as a translator?
I was always fascinated by foreign languages and cultures, and so parallel to my studies in art history in Germany I enrolled in language programs in other countries, mostly in Italy. After finishing my Ph.D. I worked on Italian Renaissance drawings at the State Graphic Arts Collection in Munich and then curated an exhibition on the same topic for the Rosenbach Museum & Library in Philadelphia. While attending the opening of this exhibition I learned that the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies in Washington, DC was looking for German translators to work on an encyclopedia. I worked for a few months on that project and found I loved it for two main reasons. First, I was glad to have a chance to put my language skills to productive use. Second, translating for publications is in essence what I did for many years as an art historian: looking for the best possible way to express a concept. So in a way, it was by chance that I started working as a translator back in 2005, but it “clicked” very quickly. In spring 2006, I registered at ProZ.com, which helped me build up a loyal client base in my field.

Q. From the details in your ProZ.com profile it looks like you have worked on some very interesting projects. Which one was your favorite?
It is hard to pick one favorite project, but in general I enjoy working on long-term projects, where I can learn a lot about a subject of interest to me in the course of translating the source text and sometimes even get the chance to write entries or essays. Over the past few years I have translated a lot on art glass, starting with “The Coburg Prize for Contemporary Glass 2014” for the Veste Coburg. This project led to the collaboration with a private collection in Hamburg, the Barbara Achilles Stiftung. The first volume of their collection catalogue was published in 2016 and we are now preparing the second volume. This is the first time I have translated the entire text for a two-volume publication from German into English. I guess that fact, in addition to my fascination with the subject, makes it probably the most challenging and rewarding project I have worked on so far.

Q. What is the most fulfilling aspect of your career as a language professional?
I find it especially fulfilling that I get to do on a daily basis that which I enjoy doing: working with languages. Since I spend most of the year in Philadelphia, translating keeps me connected with my native German, and also helps me feel close to home when I am away. Translating is work that forces you to evolve and grow every day. You have to stay up-to-date with the languages (English, German, and Italian in my case), the technology, and also with the scientific developments in the field(s) of expertise. I find the more I translate, the more this happens practically automatically.

I also appreciate the flexibility that comes with working as a freelance translator. You can plan your overall schedule and each individual day yourself, and you can work from wherever you are. It doesn’t matter if I am in my office in Philadelphia, or at my other home in Munich. This gives me the feeling of freedom that I need to thrive.

Q. How has being a member of ProZ.com helped you meet your freelance objectives?
Becoming a translator was a career change for me, even if it was a smooth transition where one step led to another. From the beginning, ProZ.com was the most important resource for finding clients. When I started as a translator, I translated a broader range of topics, such as financial, legal and medical documents. Based in the US, I was often translating into German under tight deadlines, sending the documents at 3 am so that my clients in Europe would have the translation at the beginning of their business day. As I built my reputation, I was able to focus more and more on my field of expertise and get away from the overnight jobs. Now I translate almost exclusively for art galleries, museums, editors, university professors and tourism agencies. Many of the clients I work with on a regular basis found me on ProZ.com, ranging from a philosophy professor in Florida who writes on Hegel to an art gallery in Switzerland. In fact, several of my clients I have not met in person – ProZ.com is our meeting place. My membership continues to pay dividends by giving me access to interesting clients all over the world.

Q. The theme of this campaign is ‘The Open Road’. What is next for you in your career?
I am very happy as things are right now. I have a five-year old son, and when he was little it was difficult to find a work-life balance. Now that he goes to kindergarten and becomes more and more independent, I am able to take on larger projects and still feel confident that I can deliver high quality in relatively short time frames. If anything, my plan for the future is to tackle more of these large projects.