Thank you to ProZ.com site moderators, class of 2011-2012 1

Like referees in sports, ProZ.com moderators help to ensure fair play by enforcing a specific set of rules in a uniform manner.

The ProZ.com moderator class of 2011-2012 is coming to an end, but before this happens, ProZ.com would like to thank all of those members who have given of their time to help maintain a positive, results-oriented atmosphere on the site. Each person in the class has made valuable contributions to ProZ.com, and some of them even beyond the moderator program.

ProZ.com moderators are volunteer members who have benefited from ProZ.com and have chosen to give something back by playing their part, in turn, in a system put in place to ensure fair play. Their role is to foster and protect the positive, results-oriented atmosphere that makes ProZ.com possible, by:

  • Greeting and guiding new participants, and helping them to properly use and benefit from what is available to them at ProZ.com.
  • Enforcing site rules in a consistent and structured manner to maintain a constructive environment.

The moderator class of 2011-2012 is certainly a very good example of the role. Thank you mods!

The moderator class of 2012-2013 is scheduled to begin in August. So, if you are a ProZ.com member and would like to volunteer for a one-year term as site moderator, please visit http://www.proz.com/moderators or contact site staff through the support center.

Looking forward to receiving lots of applications!

Lucía

ProZ.com Certified PRO Network: 3,000 members and counting! Reply

The ProZ.com Certified PRO Network, an initiative of the ProZ.com community to provide qualified translators and translation companies with an opportunity to network and collaborate in an environment consisting entirely of screened professionals, has reached 3,000 members and more and more applications are being submitted every day.

ProZ.com Certified PRO

Members of the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network have the benefit of networking with other screened professionals while distinguishing themselves as PROs. Many program participants view this also as an opportunity to make a positive contribution to the industry. Other benefits members of the program have include:

  • a distinguishing Certified PRO seal shown next to their name throughout the ProZ.com site;
  • a printable and downloadable certificate available in their ProZ.com profiles;
  • a special search option in the ProZ.com directory of freelance translators and interpreters, ProZ.com’s main source of jobs;
  • exclusive access to a personal workspace and to a Certified PRO Network private forum;
  • special discount on selected ProZ.com training sessions and events;
  • a distinguishing Certified PRO seal in in-person event name badges;
  • access to periodically organized virtual powwows for members of the network;
  • a Certified PRO logo to be used in personal websites, email signatures, blogs, etc.;
  • full access to ProZ.com virtual events;
  • the possibility to join Translators without Borders without going through their screening process;
  • the option to share glossaries with other members of the network;
  • the possibility to become ProZ.com mentors;
  • and more!

To enter the Certified PRO Network, ProZ.com members must complete an online application and submit it for review to prove they meet or exceed minimum professional standards based on the EN15038 standard for quality in translation and in three screening areas: translation ability, business reliability and online citizenship.

The ProZ.com Certified PRO network is being provided as a service to ProZ.com full professional members only (non-members can still complete and submit their applications for review). If admitted, members pay no additional fees.

Click here to start completing your application.

More information about the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network is available here.

Congratulations to the over 3,000 ProZ.com members who are further differentiating themselves professionally and taking networking and collaboration to a new level!

ProZ.com Certified PRO Network: PRO certification in more than one language pair released 1

The ProZ.com Certified PRO Network is an initiative of the ProZ.com community to provide qualified translators and translation companies with an opportunity to network and collaborate in an environment consisting entirely of screened professionals.

Until now, PRO certification was only possible in one language pair. However, as announced here, since January 23, 2012, members of the Certified PRO Network are invited to submit their applications for certification in a second language pair (certification in more than two language pairs will be possible at some point in the future).

Initially, the screening process seeks to establish that an applicant meets or exceeds certain minimum professional standards in three screening areas: translation ability, business reliability and “online citizenship”. Since only site members who are already members of the Certified PRO Network are allowed to apply for certification in a second language pair, only translation ability is screened in this second phase (business reliability and “online citizenship” having been confirmed during the screening process for a first language pair).

These are the requirements to apply for PRO certification in a second language pair:

Certified PRO Network badge

  • Site members must be members of the Certified PRO Network already.
  • A new application must be submitted, but containing only information on translation ability (sample translation in second pair, credentials, references, etc.).
  • Willingness to keep on networking and collaborating in an environment consisting entirely of screened professionals.

To apply for inclusion into the Certified PRO Network or, if you are already a member, to apply for certification in a second language pair, complete your application with as much information as you can and submit it for review. The screening process may take up to 30 days.

More information on the ProZ.com Certified PRO Network is available here.

Looking forward to new applications!

Kind regards,

Lucía

10 strategies to expand your translation business: Part 2 2

This is the second post in a ten-part series that provides information on ten different strategies for staying competitive and growing your translation business.

Second strategy: Working in teams

Working as part of a team of language professionals gives translators the chance to be involved in several projects, acquiring even more experience, and to expand the list of services they offer and the language pairs they offer those services in, expanding also their list of clients.

Many clients have expressed a preference for working with translation teams as opposed to single translators. These teams are often able to provide a suite of services, relying on the expertise of each team member. Many translators find that working in a well-built team also makes them more productive.

How can I build and coordinate with my team at ProZ.com?

ProZ.com members can create new translation teams and invite other site users to work together in different language pairs and fields of expertise, give and ask for KudoZ help to team members only, quote on jobs as a team and even share files and glossaries. You can see how this works here.

Have you ever worked as part of a team? How did it go?

Make sure you check the blog in the next few days to learn more about the third strategy: Mentoring.

How does where you work affect how you work? Reply

Freelance translators spend a lot of their day working, many of them from home. Some have the space and ability to work in a separate room or office at home, others work from their living rooms, the bedroom, some even seem to “migrate” from room to room with their work.

A workspace that works for you is one of the keys to working more efficiently. What approaches and work setups have worked for translators? What doesn’t work? If you could define the perfect workspace for you, what would it be?

Last month, a new site area was released with the aim of allowing translators to collaborate on issues like these. The Share your workspace area includes a collection of previous discussions about workspaces and setups, a forum dedicated to discussing related issues, and a collection of photos of freelance translator workspaces and comments shared with the community (if you haven’t already, grab a camera, take some pics of your work area and send them in!).

Two ProZ.com Wiki articles tie into the concept of using your workspace to work more productively from home (or from wherever you happen to be): Productivity for translators: an overview and Using a home office. I invite you to have a look at these articles; there may be information there which you can apply. And if you can, please add to these articles to make them even better. The ProZ.com Wiki is a resource which allows language professionals to collaborate and share information on translation, business issues, and other matters related to the profession.

Workspace photo courtesy of Jan Willem van Dormolen, http://www.proz.com/profile/52104

What do you think? Are the key points of a freelancer’s workspace covered in those articles? How is a translator’s workspace different from others’ workspaces? What else goes towards making a comfortable, productive workspace, in your experience?

Jared