Getting the most out of industry events: Part one Reply

Translation industry events are probably one of the most important parts in the marketing strategy of many language professionals. But there is more to industry events than just registering and showing up.

Be it as an attendee, a speaker or a sponsor, industry events offer freelance translators and others in the language industry the possibility to learn about industry trends, gain new skills and network. So, once you have registered for an event, what can you do to prepare and get the most out of it?

This is the first in a series of weekly blog posts with tips to get the most out of translation industry events. These tips will be grouped into “before the event”, “during the event” and “after the event” for easy reference. Please feel free to post below and share your tip(s)!

Before the event

Tip 1: build relationships

Once you have decided to attend an industry event and signed up, the next step is to build relationships with other event participants or reinforce relationships with participants you have already met. Why wait until the event to let others know who you are? Why not share now your expectations? Why not let others know more about you, the services you offer, your fields of expertise, etc. and get to the event feeling you already know everyone?

First conference – Porto Santo Stefano, Italy, 2001

Pre-event networking is probably one of the most effective and easy strategies event attendees can apply to put themselves on event participants’ radars (colleagues, potential clients and vendors) and get the most out of an event when the moment comes to network in person.

Here are some ideas for some pre-event networking:

  • Write and share your bio: if the event registration platform allows it, in two or three lines, tell other event participants who you are, where you live, the services you offer, your credentials and any other relevant details. This bio will not only help participants to know you, but also to remember you. Make sure you also check bios written by others and see if any of them live in your country or work in your fields of expertise, you may want to invite them a cup of coffee during the event to share experiences.
  • Interact via social networks: in general, industry events have dedicated hashtags for Twitter and Facebook. Check out the activity under the event hashtag in the weeks leading up to the event to see who else is attending. Check attendees’ posts, share their important messages, mention them in comments, follow them (or add them as friends). This will also help other attendees to remember you when you meet at the event.
  • Express your expectations: when possible, share your expectations of the event with other attendees (“I’ll be attending the session on negotiation tips because I need to learn new negotiation strategies. Anyone else attending?”). You may be surprised to see that others may also share your expectations, or learn what others would like to get out of the event.
  • Engage in discussions: based on the event program, propose topics for discussion via social networks, or post to discussions and share your views. Sharing your ideas about a given topic will encourage others to do the same, allowing all involved to learn more and be better prepared for sessions you will attend in person.
  • Contact attendees directly: if possible, contact one or two attendees directly and make plans to share a meal or a drink during the event. Keep in mind that contacting all attendees may be both annoying for them and fruitless for you. Focus on attendees that work in your language pairs or in your fields of expertise for instance, people that will have points in common with you and that may provide you with useful insights about the industry.

Technological developments over the last years have facilitated pre-event networking and now professionals can meet way before they actually meet face-to-face. It’s up to you to meet and network with colleagues attending future industry events to get the most of these when attending!

What other tip(s) would you add on pre-event networking? 

What has worked for you? What hasn’t?

Post below.

The next part in this series will explain the benefits of keeping yourself updated on event-related news. Stay tuned…



Summary of the 2013 international conference in Porto Reply

The 2013 international conference in Porto in over, but its spirit still seems to be in all and each of the attendees to this event. With hundreds of Tweets, Facebook posts, feedback comments, pictures, videos, reports and whatnot, this conference seems to have reminded professionals of the importance of networking and learning in professional development.

Careful planning and detailed organization were evidently the secret ingredients for the success of this event. The three session tracks offered led to a good variety of presentations to choose from and the different social options available –sightseeing tour, wine taste, powwows– helped attendees to make connections more quickly and easily.

In sum, this is what this event offered to attendees:

  • Thirty different sessions, divided in three tracks.
  • Two  powwows, one at Restaurante Commercial, one of the most iconic restaurants in Porto, and a second one at Restaurante BibóPorto, a restaurant that offers exquisite traditional Portuguese dishes.
  • A sight-seeing tour around the city.
  • A wine taste at Burmester Cellars, where we had the chance to taste the most famous port wine.
  • A gala dinner also with great food and wine.
  • A one-day workshop on “Negotiation”.
  • The chance to meet fellow translators and promote themselves among peers.

As a staff member, I must say that I’m not only proud of being part of this amazing community, but also honored to have had the chance of spending these amazing days with new friends. Thanks Paula Ribeiro, Maria Pereira and Rafaela Lemos for working tirelessly over the past year to bring this wonderful event to life. Also, thanks speakers for sharing your time, energy and expertise. And, above all, thank you attendees for making this event possible!

Here is a video summary of the event for you to watch and share:

Hope to see you all soon at the next event!



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See feedback, pictures and more »

Share pictures » Certified PRO Network: applications from translation companies now accepted Reply

The Certified PRO Network, an initiative of the community that has the purpose of identifying qualified translators and providing them with the option of networking and collaborating while distinguishing themselves as professionals, is now open to translation companies willing to demonstrate their unique capabilities in keeping with published industry standards. Certified PRO Network

The Certified PRO Network keeps growing.

Allowing translation companies to apply for inclusion into the network is expected to have, among others, the following benefits:

  • Network expansion.
  • More successful service provider-outsourcer working relationships.
  • More room for direct communication and collaboration between service providers and companies.
  • A better understanding on the part of outsourcers of what being a Certified PRO means.
  • Extended network promotion.

Translation companies willing to enter the Certified PRO Network will be required to prove that they meet or exceed minimum professional standards in two screening areas: (1) business reliability and (2) good citizenship.

Information that screeners will check when reviewing company applications includes Blue Board record history and payment practices, number of years in the translation industry, client feedback, standards or certifications, quality processes followed and activity. Other data, such as services offered and capacity, may also be taken into account.

If you run a translation company, consider applying for inclusion into the Certified PRO Network by completing your online application.

More information about PRO certification is available in the Certified PRO Network FAQs section (recently updated).

Application from freelancers are also being reviewed on a daily basis. So, if you are a freelancer and you would like to enter the network, apply now. Certified PRO Network: 3,000 members and counting! Reply

The Certified PRO Network, an initiative of the community to provide qualified translators and translation companies with an opportunity to network and collaborate in an environment consisting entirely of screened professionals, has reached 3,000 members and more and more applications are being submitted every day. Certified PRO

Members of the Certified PRO Network have the benefit of networking with other screened professionals while distinguishing themselves as PROs. Many program participants view this also as an opportunity to make a positive contribution to the industry. Other benefits members of the program have include:

  • a distinguishing Certified PRO seal shown next to their name throughout the site;
  • a printable and downloadable certificate available in their profiles;
  • a special search option in the directory of freelance translators and interpreters,’s main source of jobs;
  • exclusive access to a personal workspace and to a Certified PRO Network private forum;
  • special discount on selected training sessions and events;
  • a distinguishing Certified PRO seal in in-person event name badges;
  • access to periodically organized virtual powwows for members of the network;
  • a Certified PRO logo to be used in personal websites, email signatures, blogs, etc.;
  • full access to virtual events;
  • the possibility to join Translators without Borders without going through their screening process;
  • the option to share glossaries with other members of the network;
  • the possibility to become mentors;
  • and more!

To enter the Certified PRO Network, members must complete an online application and submit it for review to prove they meet or exceed minimum professional standards based on the EN15038 standard for quality in translation and in three screening areas: translation ability, business reliability and online citizenship.

The Certified PRO network is being provided as a service to full professional members only (non-members can still complete and submit their applications for review). If admitted, members pay no additional fees.

Click here to start completing your application.

More information about the Certified PRO Network is available here.

Congratulations to the over 3,000 members who are further differentiating themselves professionally and taking networking and collaboration to a new level! Certified PRO Network: PRO certification in more than one language pair released 1

The Certified PRO Network is an initiative of the community to provide qualified translators and translation companies with an opportunity to network and collaborate in an environment consisting entirely of screened professionals.

Until now, PRO certification was only possible in one language pair. However, as announced here, since January 23, 2012, members of the Certified PRO Network are invited to submit their applications for certification in a second language pair (certification in more than two language pairs will be possible at some point in the future).

Initially, the screening process seeks to establish that an applicant meets or exceeds certain minimum professional standards in three screening areas: translation ability, business reliability and “online citizenship”. Since only site members who are already members of the Certified PRO Network are allowed to apply for certification in a second language pair, only translation ability is screened in this second phase (business reliability and “online citizenship” having been confirmed during the screening process for a first language pair).

These are the requirements to apply for PRO certification in a second language pair:

Certified PRO Network badge

  • Site members must be members of the Certified PRO Network already.
  • A new application must be submitted, but containing only information on translation ability (sample translation in second pair, credentials, references, etc.).
  • Willingness to keep on networking and collaborating in an environment consisting entirely of screened professionals.

To apply for inclusion into the Certified PRO Network or, if you are already a member, to apply for certification in a second language pair, complete your application with as much information as you can and submit it for review. The screening process may take up to 30 days.

More information on the Certified PRO Network is available here.

Looking forward to new applications!

Kind regards,


Podcast: interview with Paula Góes about Lingua — Global Voices translation project 1

Here’s a new podcast. These podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement).

In searching translation news on the Internet I came across Global Voices. I noticed that many of the projects were very interesting and I was specially intrigued by its translation project called Lingua so I got in touch with Paula Góez, Global Voices multilingual editor to learn more about Global Voices and the Lingua project.

At the beginning of the interview I asked Paula how she got involved with Global Voices and she explained that she first trained as a journalist and worked as a TV producer. She felt at ease with the written word so she became a translator when se went to London in 2002. Searching for blogs about translation she found out that the Global Voices project in Portuguese had just been launched and after reading the manifesto she knew it was the kind of project with which she wanted to get involved. She started as a volunteer translator in 2007 and then she also started to write. She found that her job was coming in between her volunteering activity so she decided to become a full-time freelancer and was invited to join Global Voices as its multilingual editor. She explained that Global Voices is a community of more than 400 bloggers and translators around the world who work together to bring reports from blogs and citizen media everywhere, with emphasis on voices that are not ordinarily heard in international mainstream media. Global Voices was founded in 2005 by former CNN Beijing and Tokyo Bureau Chief, Rebecca MacKinnon and technologist and Africa expert, Ethan Zuckerman while they were both fellows at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. The idea for the project grew out of an international bloggers’ meeting held at Harvard in December 2004 and it began as a simple blog.

In addition to the main news room there are a number of projects which are mostly born from the communities. These projects include: Global Voices Advocacy, Rising Voices, and the one Paula finds most exciting — the lingua project, which is the translation project of Global Voices. When Global Voices started in 2005 it was only available in English and the communities felt the need to have it in more languages so in 2007 they started with 5 languages and now they have over 30 active sites with translations coming in every day. There have been 10,200 translations posted since January 2011. She also explains how lingua changed from being a translation project into being a multilingual newsroom and how this process came very naturally as the community grew and there were a lot of people who could both translate and write and create content in other languages. As the majority of bloggers and editors did not speak English as their first language it made sense to have them write in their native languages. They created a decentralized workflow, a multilingual newsroom, where a news is written in a language other than English and then translated into English. This means, for example, that a news can be translated from Spanish straight into French so that English becomes less of a dominant language and other languages take more space. They did this because it is easier for people to write in their own language and stories came out faster. And what is really important now is that, in oder to be a volunteer for global voices, you do not need to know English as you can write in your own language.

To get involved translators only need to get in touch. Global voices does not require a formal qualification but people in charge of translations should know the language they are translating from and should be good writers. There are many professionals performing this task now. It is a great opportunity for aspiring translators as it is a great way to practise and build a portfolio to show off. Those who would like to volunteer only have to get in touch. There is a form you can fill at the bottom of this page.

Listen to the interview with Paula Góes here: podcast, 2011-09-02

Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at or via Twitter @ProZcom .

Those interested in learning more about Global Voices and its Lingua project can check the bottom of the Lingua page and complete the form corresponding to the language of their interest. You can also follow Global Voices on Twitter @globalvoices.

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.


10 strategies to expand your translation business: Part 6 Reply

This is the sixth post in a ten-part series providing information on ten different strategies for staying competitive and growing your translation business.

Sixth strategy: Staying abreast of industry news and trends

Knowing about the latest translation industry trends and joining related discussions either on-line or in person allow professional translators to exchange information with colleagues and build a strong relationship with them, leading to job opportunities.

Also, if you have knowledge or news others would benefit from, don’t keep it to yourself! Sharing information on translation or business issues not only helps others and benefits the entire profession, but it is also a good way to promote yourself and your services.

How can I use to inform and stay informed?

At, there are several areas through which professional translators can keep up on current translation-related events and news, and share their own knowledge:

  • In the Wiki language professionals can start collaborative articles on relevant, industry related topics and contribute to already existing articles and discussions.
  • In Translation news articles, translators can post translation industry-related news, comment on, share and subscribe to items that have been posted.
  • In the Articles knowledge base, language professionals can read articles on topics of interest to translators, interpreters, and other language professionals, or post their own articles.

What other sources of translation-related news do you know? Do you have your own space to share news?

Make sure you check the upcoming post on Social networking. Stay tuned!