The voting phase of the Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 competition will end soon Reply

Hi all,

As announced here the voting phase of the Top 100 Language Lovers 2011 competition will end on May 29 (so soon!).

ProZ.com’s page on Facebook has been nominated for the category “Language Facebook Pages” and ProZ.com twitter account is competing in the category “Language Twitterers“.

The competition also looks for the best in these two categories:  Language Learning Blogs and  Language Professional Blogs. So if you would like to participate in the voting and help recognize your colleagues’ work remember to cast your vote before May 29,  23:59 hours German time.

And… if you like the content on ProZ.com Facebook page and Twitter account, this is your chance to show it!

Romina

Update: Both ProZ.com’s page on Facebook and ProZ.com twitter account have made it to the top 25.

@ProZcom 

ProZ.com http://www.facebook.com/prozdotcom

Time flies and here is a new and very special ProZ.com podcast — interview with Henry Dotterer (ProZ.com CEO) Reply

Hi all,

It’s nice to write a new post to announce that a new podcast is now available. ProZ.com podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement) .

This week’s podcast is special as you will have the chance to listen to an interview with Henry Dotterer, ProZ.com founder and CEO, and Translators without Borders board member, talking about the work Translators without Borders has been doing with the aid of the Translation Center platform.

ProZ.com podcast, 2011-05-27

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Stay tuned!

Romina

Time to listen to the 4th ProZ.com podcast! Reply

Hi all!

I’m happy to share with you the fourth ProZ.com podcast (four already? wow!). ProZ.com podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement). In this week’s podcast you will find:

You can see the photos of the London powwows here.

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Have fun!

Romina

Background music: Tea Roots by Kevin MacLeod

Third ProZ.com podcast now available Reply

Hi there!

I’m happy to share with you the third ProZ.com podcast. ProZ.com podcasts are designed to provide an opportunity to hear the week’s news, highlights of site features, interviews with translators and others in the industry, and to have some fun (see announcement) . In this week’s podcast you will find:

ProZ.com podcast, 2011-05-13

The photos of this interview have been posted on the ProZ.com page on Facebook

I hope you like it! Feedback and comments are welcome. You can reach me at romina at proz.com or via Twitter @ProZcom .

To listen to previous podcasts, check the podcasts tab in this blog.

Have fun!

Romina

Background music:  Tafi Maradi by Kevin MacLeod

Membership: when and why should translators pay? 2

There was an inquiry this morning regarding a translator portal– to purchase membership there or not? I am copying here my reply, and would like to hear from others on this:

Hi Mike,

I’m not familiar with that site. I can give you some general advice when it comes to investing in membership at translator portals, and maybe others can add to this as well.

There are many sites which offer services for professional translators. Most of these will allow you to register and use some features or give you limited access to what they have to offer for free. What you get for free is not necessarily indicative of what the return on paid membership there will be, of course, but it can give you an idea.

I would recommend registering at several different portals, after doing some homework on each (a few Google searches can usually turn up pros and cons for a site, to begin with). Get what you need from each of those sites, no need to limit yourself to just one.

When it comes to opening your wallet for paid services for translators, make sure you’ve formed a clear idea of what you want in return. A membership fee should be viewed as an investment, and not necessarily a magic solution to get jobs– professional, well-paying clients look for professional translators (this does not mean that there is not room for other levels of translation work, see http://www.proz.com/?sp=rates&sp_mode=overview for an example of what I’m talking about), and you need to be able to show this in your online presence anywhere. Getting direct access to jobs is only a (small?) piece of the puzzle; keep in mind that networking, for example, can play an important part in building your online presence and in meeting new clients.

Ask other paid members on the sites where you’ve registered what they’re getting out of their membership. Ask more than one– most translators are more than willing to share this kind of info or to pass on a few pointers, and you may find that each person you ask is getting something different that they find valuable out of their membership (or not!).

Membership fees can differ from site to site, and it all depends on what you expect in return– is 150 bucks too expensive? If it leads to one new regular client, probably not.

Before paying for membership anywhere, also make sure it readily clear to whom you are making the payment (the person, persons or company behind the site or service), that the payment options are reputable, and what your options are for requesting a refund should you decide the service is not for you.

I know this doesn’t really answer your question, but I hope it helps.

What advice would you share with other translators or aspiring translators when it comes to the membership question? What steps should translators take to make those investments smartly?

Translation blogs: what does your top 5 list look like? 25

Silvina Jover-Cirillo (author of Lingua Franca Weekly)  brought another translator blog to my attention this morning, in the discussion for “Twitter for translators?”

There are a lot of translation-related blogs out there. Which ones do you follow? If you had to list your top five, blogs which are active and which you find useful or interesting to follow as a language professional, which would they be?